What [do you have planed] for tonight?

Junwei Guo

Senior Member
Chinese
1. What do you have planned for tonight?
2. What have you planned for tonight?
Is #1 possible? If so, what's the difference between them?
I think #1 is from the construction: have something planned
and #2 is from the construction: plan something
Thanks in advance!
 
  • RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    In AE they would be used in different contexts (which you haven't provided). The first is by far the most common and is typically for activities, going out, etc. The second is a little ambiguous.
     

    Junwei Guo

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    In AE they would be used in different contexts (which you haven't provided). The first is by far the most common and is typically for activities, going out, etc. The second is a little ambiguous.
    For example:
    A: I'm so busy tonight.
    B: Oh really? ______________
    In this context, what's the difference between:
    1. What do you have planned for tonight?
    2. What have you planned for tonight?
    Thanks in advance!
     

    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    Well, it's easy for the first because that's what everybody says in most situations. It's a very generic statement. Number 2 is not totally suited for the brief dialogue. It implies, perhaps, that there has been a discussion about different planning scenarios. One for Saturday night, one for tonight (Friday). That sort of thing. You're dealing with pretty general things so it's hard to get very specific about it. One important thing to take into consideration is that the normal way of asking a question is to use the verb "do". What do you ... How do you ... etc.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    what's the difference between them?
    I would use the "What do you have planned" version when asking what your plans are. Equivalent to "What are you doing tonight?".
    The "What have you planned" version would fit a context in which I already know that you are organizing (say) an engagement party, and I wanted to know what preparations you've made, e.g. what special entertainments you've laid on. "Will there be a stripper popping out of a cake? If so, I think you should reconsider, even at this late stage, because the prospective in-laws are coming, and would not be amused."
     

    Junwei Guo

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I would use the "What do you have planned" version when asking what your plans are. Equivalent to "What are you doing tonight?".
    The "What have you planned" version would fit a context in which I already know that you are organizing (say) an engagement party, and I wanted to know what preparations you've made, e.g. what special entertainments you've laid on. "Will there be a stripper popping out of a cake? If so, I think you should reconsider, even at this late stage, because the prospective in-laws are coming, and would not be amused."
    Thanks :)
     

    Vronsky

    Senior Member
    Russian - Russia
    I came across this one: "So what planned do you have for today?"
    Is it correct? I think it's an equivalent to #1, isn't it?
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    Yes, it's equivalent, but no, it's incorrect (unless, perhaps, it was spoken by Yoda). It should probably be "What plans do you have for today?".
     
    Top