What does 'biscuit' mean here?

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JungKim

Senior Member
Korean
Stephen Colbert said this in his monologue:
I saw a guy at the carnival with a big mallet doing the bangy thing. That little biscuit went way up the pole. Maybe he could knock the bad guy over the head.
Here, Stephen is impersonating Trump, who would hire a guy capable of hitting something very hard with a big mallet as a teacher to fight a school shooter.
He seems to be talking about some sort of game people do at a carnival where the harder you hit, the higher the 'biscuit' goes up the pole. So the 'biscuit' seems to be some flat object to indicate how hard you hit with the mallet. What exactly is 'biscuit' here?

Also, what's this game called?
 
  • Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England


    It refers to the small object, a puck (?), which goes up the pole to indicate how hard you've hit the base with your mallet. When a real tough guy strikes the base, the puck rises rapidly to the top and strikes a bell, to the gratification of all, except the stall-owner, who has to pay up.

    "A high striker, also known as a strength tester, or strongman game, is an attraction used in funfairs, fundraisers, and carnivals." (Quote from Wiki)
     
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    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Apparently the game is called 'High Striker'.
    A high striker, also known as a strength tester, or strongman game, is an attraction used in funfairs, fundraisers, and carnivals. It operates by utilizing the lever where one end holds a puck attached to the tower and the other end is struck by the person or contestant using a hammer or mallet. The aim of players is to ring the ...
    [WIKI High Striker]
    A 'puck' is a flat round disc, fairly thick like an American 'biscuit'. If you google puck you'll find pictures of various sorts. They're used in ice hockey for example.



    American 'biscuits' are rather like British scones.

     
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    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I think not. Trump couldn't think of a correct name and in all fairness I wouldn't have been able to either, not in this 'high striker' context. I didn't even know that name of the game - I'd have called it the 'Test Your Strength' machine, somewhat more articulate than 'bangy-thingy'.
     

    exgerman

    Senior Member
    NYC
    English but my first language was German
    While everything said above is true, "Biscuit" is probably also intended to be a euphemism. The natural word to use if you don't know the right word would be "sucker".
     
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