what does gourd rhyme with

  • natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    It rhymes with your first set for me: /ɔː/ rather than /ʊə/. Mind you, the words in your second set can also have the same vowel. I can say /ʃɔː/ or /ʃʊə/ for sure.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    All of them have the same vowel for me! Are they all pure vowels for you? Can you describe how the vowels are different if you prefer not to use the phonetic alphabet?
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    I'm not very familiar with the phonetic alphabet.
    Are they all pure vowels for you?
    If you mean a monophthong, yes, they are.

    The vowel sound in sword is like the vowel sound in toe/toad (and soared), while the vowel sound in lord is like that in lot.
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    I am sure you are not finding the best examples, Barque. :)

    gourd, lord, sword, corps, pauper, chord, Paul, etc. - all have the long /o/ vowel and sound the same when I say them (as given by Nat, yes /ɔː/)

    toe, foe, mow, hope, soap, roam, foam, float, etc. - all have the diphthong /əu/ or /ou/ in AE
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    OK, I have a three-way distinction between these three words: coat-caught-cot. Therefore also: goad-gourd-god.

    It sounds as if (some) IndE speakers have a two-way distinction if sword is aligned to coat and lord to cot.
     

    Rival

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    I pronounce 'gourd' with the same vowel as 'poor', so it rhymes with assured, and lured.
    In John Wells's system, it's the CURE vowel, /ʊə/.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    "Gourd" is /ɡʊəd/ for me, so, yes, it has the CURE vowel.

    However, I don't have the CURE value in "assure" *, so while "gourd" rhymes with "lured" for me, it doesn't rhyme with "assured".

    I have the feeling we've discussed this area of variability before: I'll see if I can find the previous discussion.

    .....
    * or "poor"
     
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    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    The vowel sound in sword is like the vowel sound in toe/toad (and soared), while the vowel sound in lord is like that in lot.
    I suspect the issue here is that Indian English doesn't have the horse-hoarse merger. From English-language vowel changes before historic /r/ - Wikipedia

    The horsehoarse merger or north–force merger is the merger of the vowels /ɔ/ and /oʊ/(actually, historically, /oː/) before historic /r/, making pairs of words like horsehoarse, forfour, warwore, oroar, morningmourning etc. homophones. This merger occurs in most varieties of English today, despite historically keeping the two phonemes separate. In accents that have the merger, horse and hoarse are both pronounced [hɔː(ɹ)s~hoː(ɹ)s], but in accents that do not have the merger hoarse is pronounced with a higher vowel, usually [hoɹs] in rhotic and [hoəs] or the like in non-rhotic accents. Non-merging accents include most Scottish, Caribbean, and older Southern American accents, plus some African American vernacular, modern Southern American, Indian, Irish, and older Maine accents.[...]​
     
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    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    A very interesting point, Loob!

    However, that does not explain how lord can be different from sword and, at the same time, use the same short vowel of lot. Unless...

    (Barque, do you pronounce the 'r' in lord? If you do, I agree the quality of the 'o' sound should be more or less the same in lord and lot)
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    OK, so in Indian English, gourd and gored will have the 'oh' vowel.

    And hoarse also has the same vowel, and horse as the vowel in lot?
     
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