what does Lewenstein want to say with "residual"

karobu

New Member
Spanish
No body answer me about this question, why?.... I want to know what does Lewenstein want to say with the word residual.

5 percent of the American public is scientifically literate, and only 20 percent are interested and informed. The rest, by formal definition, are "residual" ... :confused:
 
  • Rob625

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hello Karobu, and welcome!

    You are not doing anything wrong; you are just being too impatient.

    The sentence you quote doesn't make very good sense. You can look up 'residual' in any dictionary. It means 'what remains, what is left over'. It isn't true to say that people who are not scientifically literate are residual; and to say that they are certainly not a formal definition of the word 'residual'.

    By the way, we don't say 'want to say' :cross:. We say 'what does Lewenstein mean by the word ...' :tick:
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Bienvenido al foro Karobu,

    Rob is correct. Patience is a requirement in the forum. Sometimes a post is not answered as quickly as one might like, but this is not an online chat room!

    The sense I get from the quote is that the author believes that most people are neither scientifically literate, nor informed. Thus, he has chosen to characterize the majority of the population as "residual" or, as Rob says, left over. It's an insulting way to describe the majority as not meaningful.

    Saludos,
    Cuchufléte

    PS- Rob....a slight disagreement: If a scientific research study is defined to identify and classify a population according to membership in two classes only, (1)scientifically literate, and (2) informed and interested, then all members of the sample not qualifying as either of these may be called, in the jargon of the research, "residual". You and I may not like it if we take it to be a judgement, but within the linguistic rules of the exercise, it is a valid label.
     

    Nick

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Rob625 said:
    By the way, we don't say 'want to say' :cross:. We say 'what does Lewenstein mean by the word ...' :tick:
    "What does he want to say" is completely fine. "What does he mean" and "What is he trying to say" are also fine.

    Rob625 said:
    The sentence you quote doesn't make very good sense.
    By the way, we don't say 'make very good sense' :cross:. We say 'make very much sense' :tick:
     
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