What does she feel? Hunger/hungry

Tenacious Learner

Senior Member
Spanish
Hola a tod@s
De acuerdo a este párrafo:
Molly isn't very happy about that. In fact, she's angry. she’s also very hungry, and she has to eat out.

Estas serían dos posibles preguntas:
1. How does she feel? Angry.
2. What does she feel? Hunger.

Mi pregunta:
Si traduzco "Hunger" es "tener hambre" y "Hungry" es "tener hambre/estar hambriento".
Dicho esto, ¿Por qué la respuesta correcta de la 2 es "hunger" y no "hungry"?

Muchas gracias.
 
  • Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    Gracias! Entonces la respuesta a "What does somebody feel?" siempre debe llevar un sustantivo en la respuesta; ¿Correcto?
    Salvo que algún nativo diga lo contrario, sí. En castellano es igual. A la pregunta ¿qué sientes?, respondes hambre; no hambriento.
     

    Cholo234

    Senior Member
    American English
    because a noun always answers the question "What?"
    Entonces la respuesta a "What does somebody feel?" siempre debe llevar un sustantivo en la respuesta; ¿Correcto?

    Según Guide to Parts of Speech de Grossmont College, "a noun always answers the question 'What?'" (Hay que recordar que gerundios (palabras que se deletrean como participios presentes) y cláusulas del sustantivo pueden funcionar como sustantivos.)

    Sentence Types-English 098-Grossmont College
     
    Last edited:

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    Molly isn't very happy about that. In fact, she's angry. she’s also very hungry, and she has to eat out.

    Estas serían dos posibles preguntas:
    1. How does she feel? Angry.
    2. What does she feel? Hunger.
    Actually, I would answer those as follows.

    1. Angry and hungry
    2. Anger and hunger

    It doesn't make sense to answer 1 with angry and 2 with hunger.
     

    Tenacious Learner

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Actually, I would answer those as follows.

    1. Angry and hungry
    2. Anger and hunger

    It doesn't make sense to answer 1 with angry and 2 with hunger.
    Muchísimas gracias, gengo.

    Can you correct or confirm these questions and explanations between parentheses?

    How does she feel? / How is she feeling? (Since the verb is inherently static I could say it either way; right)
    She is angry and hungry. (be + adjective/s.)

    Do "How does she feel?/How is she feeling?" always ask for her physical and emotional sensations?




    What does she feel? (What thing/s does she feel?)
    She feels anger and hunger. (This is the only possible answer, isn't it?. I can't answer with the verb "be" at all, can I?

    If all the above is correct, then the question "What does she feel?" asks for...

    EDITED
    On second though, could it be that both questions "How does she feel?/What does she feel?" ask for the same, "physical and emotional sensations" and the only difference is in the answer?
    How does she feel? (be + adjective/s.)
    What does she feel? (feel/s + noun/s.)
     
    Last edited:

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    How does she feel? / How is she feeling? (Since the verb is inherently static I could say it either way, right?)
    She is angry and hungry. (be + adjective/s.)

    Do "How does she feel?/How is she feeling?" always ask for her physical and emotional sensations?
    Yes, you can say it either way. And yes, those questions are about physical and emotional wellness.
    What does she feel? (What thing/s does she feel?)
    She feels anger and hunger. (This is the only possible answer, isn't it?. I can't answer with the verb "be" at all, can I?
    The strictly correct answer is no, "to be" doesn't work. But in real life we often answer in ways that don't exactly match the question, so I suppose you could answer the above with "she is angry," etc.
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    In this context "What does she feel?" seems an unusual question, but "anger and hunger" seem a little too technically literal to be appropriate answers.

    In fact, the answer does not have to be a noun:

    What does she feel?
    (She feels) she should not be treated this way.

    What does she feel?
    (She feels) put upon.

    What does she feel?
    (She feels) unhappy.

    These same answers could fit "How does she feel?" too, but in context I think they fit the "What" question better than "anger and hunger".
     

    Tenacious Learner

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Yes, you can say it either way. And yes, those questions are about physical and emotional wellness.
    The strictly correct answer is no, "to be" doesn't work. But in real life we often answer in ways that don't exactly match the question, so I suppose you could answer the above with "she is angry," etc.
    Muchas gracias por su ayuda, gengo. Crystal clear now.
     

    Tenacious Learner

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    In this context "What does she feel?" seems an unusual question, but "anger and hunger" seem a little too technically literal to be appropriate answers.

    In fact, the answer does not have to be a noun:

    What does she feel?
    (She feels) she should not be treated this way.

    What does she feel?
    (She feels) put upon.

    What does she feel?
    (She feels) unhappy.
    Interesting examples, Forero. Never though about them.

    If I'm not mistaken, I just realise that when we ask "What does somebody feel? we use "feel" in the answer, and when we ask "How does somebody feel?" we use "be" in the answer. As gengo said, that is the strictly correct answer.
     
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