what does she..? or what drinks she?

conceive

New Member
Czech, Czech
What does she drink?

What drinks she?

What is grammatically correct? The first one for sure, what about the second one?
 
  • dwipper

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    The second construction is used very rarely, if ever, today. The only time I could imagine someone saying something like this with a verb other than do is with have e.g. "Have you enough to drink?" and even then I would avoid it (unless it's part of a perfect verb). You're always safe with a form of do.
     

    conceive

    New Member
    Czech, Czech
    The second construction is used very rarely, if ever, today. The only time I could imagine someone saying something like this with a verb other than do is with have e.g. "Have you enough to drink?" and even then I would avoid it (unless it's part of a perfect verb). You're always safe with a form of do.

    As far as I know "Have you a computer?" is a typical one expression from British English. In GB they use verb "have" without the auxiliary "do" in questions and in negative statements.
     

    mirx

    Banned
    Español
    As far as I know "Have you a computer?" is a typical one expression from British English. In GB they use verb "have" without the auxiliary "do" in questions and in negative statements.


    Yes they do it all the time,

    Have you any brothers?
    Have you an idea?
    I haven't a clue...
     

    Victoria32

    Senior Member
    English (UK) New Zealand
    Yes they do it all the time,

    Have you any brothers?
    Have you an idea?
    I haven't a clue...
    That sounds very natural to me... the last one was one of my Mum's favourite expressions.


    "Have you a computer", again sounds very natural, but I wouldn't teach it to my students as they are not too likely to hear it here.
     

    Tei Tetua

    Member
    UK + USA, English
    Depends on the intention of the question:

    When she goes to her favorite bar, what does she order? "What does she drink?" This is the simple present.

    But if she's got the drink right now, not necessarily as a habitual thing, then it's "What is she drinking?" This is the present continuous.

    They're not quite the same!
     
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