what fiddle-dee-fee

nownow

Member
Japanese
I'm reading the picture book what called "The Monster Bed".

I could understand about story but couldn't understand this "what fiddle-dee-fee".
It is not "
what fiddle-dee-dee" but "what fiddle-dee-fee".
What does it mean?
What is the difference?

This is the story that monster child who fears human and human child who fears monster meets.
That phrase apper as follow

"The humans will get me." cried Dennis(monster child). "They'll creep under my bed, when I'm asleep." "Oh, no," said his mummy, "
I cannot agree, there are no human beings, what fiddle-dee-fee. They are only stories. They don't exist. Now get into bed and be quiet and kissed. "


Please help me.
 
  • Mole144

    Member
    English - English
    Hello :)

    I think "fiddle-dee-fee" is a made up word to sound like the way parents talk to their children.

    "What fiddle-dee-fee" would just mean "what nonsense" or something like that.
     

    Hildy1

    Senior Member
    English - US and Canada
    What a useful expression. It would work well in cases such as "There are no dishonest accountants / lawyers / etc. What fiddle-dee-fee."
     

    nownow

    Member
    Japanese
    Hi friends
    Thank you for answering my question.

    I see. That means "nonsence". I understood.
    But I'm still thinking this phrase.
    "Fiddle-dee-fee" is not in my dictionary and google.
    what I can find by my dictionary and google is "Fiddle-dee-Dee(Fiddle-de(e)-dee)"

    What is the difference?
    Should I think as same phrase?

    Thank you
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hi friends
    Thank you for answering my question.

    I see. That means "nonsence". I understood.
    But I'm still thinking this phrase.
    "Fiddle-dee-fee" is not in my dictionary and google.
    what I can find by my dictionary and google is "Fiddle-dee-Dee(Fiddle-de(e)-dee)"

    What is the difference?
    Should I think as same phrase?

    Thank you
    In this context I would take the two expressions to mean exactly the same.

    ______________________________________________________________________
    In the context of financial dealings I would take it to mean 'fiddle the fee' thus indicating sharp practice. This is unlikely in a children's tale.
     

    nownow

    Member
    Japanese
    Thank you Biffo.
    I really aprriciate your answering.

    Could you tell me one more question?

    I found the song called "I bought me a cat".
    It's old american song.

    part of lylic:
    Bought me a cat and the cat pleased me,
    I fed my cat under yonder tree.
    Cat goes fiddle-i-fee.


    In this song, what does fiddle-i-fee means?
    Please tell me if you have any idea.


    Thank you
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    If you go through the rest of that song, you'll find that all the animals (and the wife) make strange sounds - they convey what the animal (or wife) says, but don't mean anything. This sort of word (in all its variations) is common in old songs and rhymes.
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    From a songwriter's perspective the use of the "fiddle-de-fee," with the repetition of the letter f, is suitable. "Fiddle-di-dee" or "fiddle-dee-dee" are the recognized spellings that you will find in literature and movies.

    Note that even the accepted "fiddle-dee-dee" is not commonly used by the great majority of American English speakers; I suspect that equally true for British English. If it was ever widely used, it is not so now.
     

    Sparky Malarky

    Moderator
    English - US
    Just a guess, but I wonder if the writer of the "monster" book chose to have the monster mommy say something a little different than what the human mommy would say. So if a human would call nonsense "fiddle-dee-dee" a monster calls nonsese "fiddle-dee-fee," because monsters are almost like humans but a little bit different.

    Or maybe the writer just liked the sound and thought it would be more fun to say. Either way, it's just a nonsense word.
     
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