What have we wrought

aintor

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi Everyone,

I can see "What have we wrought?" being used everywhere and it seems to be quite a common sentence. Yet I find no explanation to this sentence, probably because it's too commonly used.

Does it mean "What have we done"?
 
  • xqby

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    I can see "What have we wrought?" being used everywhere and it seems to be quite a common sentence.
    Everywhere? Can you provide examples? I don't think of "wrought" as at all common.

    It would probably mean something like "done" or "made," yes, but it's hard to say without context.
     

    aintor

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Everywhere? Can you provide examples? I don't think of "wrought" as at all common.

    It would probably mean something like "done" or "made," yes, but it's hard to say without context.
    Hi xqby,

    When I google this sentence, it's all over the screen.

    As for examples:

    Dear God What Have We Wrought?!

    “What have we wrought over these past 70 years?” asked Hassebrook.

    What have we wrought with in our lives?

    ......
     

    AmEStudent

    Senior Member
    Italian/Albanian - bilingual
    All I can say is that wrought is the archaic past simple and participle of "work", so yeah, I guess it would mean "What have we done"
     

    WyomingSue

    Senior Member
    English--USA
    The meaning provided above is correct. "What hath God wrought" was the first sentence transmitted in 1844 by Samuel Morse when he invented the telegraph. I don't know why it would be particularly popular now.
     

    aintor

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    The meaning provided above is correct. "What hath God wrought" was the first sentence transmitted in 1844 by Samuel Morse when he invented the telegraph. I don't know why it would be particularly popular now.

    Haha, probably because it's such a weird expression. Thank you, WyomingSue
     

    ColoradoPhil

    New Member
    English - English
    See the King James Bible, Old Testament, Numbers 23:23.

    Surely there is no enchantment against Jacob, neither is there any divination against Israel: according to this time it shall be said of Jacob and of Israel, What hath God wrought!
    as compared to the Contemporary English Version

    No magic charms can work against them – just look what God has done for his people.
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    sami33

    Senior Member
    arabic
    Hi everybody!

    To show that his telegraphic instrument worked, Samuel F. Morse went before Congress and sent a message over a wire by electrcity, from Washington to Baltimore. The message was: what hath God wrought?
    Please I want to understand the meaning of the red sentence because I'm not sure about the sense of "wrought" in the context.

    Thanks
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    'Wrought' is the past tense of 'wreak', which is an old form of the word 'work' (as a verb), meaning 'make' or 'do'.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Mod note: I have merged the thread started by sami (post 9) with one started earlier on the same topic. Sami, please also read the earlier posts to see if they answer your question.
     
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