What is more?

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Faktum

Senior Member
Norway
Hi

Is this the correct use of the phrase "what is more"? I am using it to link sentences together.


Another reason is that students begin to believe in themselves more when they go abroad. Living in a foreign country is a wonderful “confidence builder.”


What is more, studying abroad teaches students a lot about other cultures. I believe this is one of the most important reasons why students choose to study abroad.
 
  • Porteño

    Member Emeritus
    British English
    That sounds just perfect to me, although it would be interesting to see the preceding sentences as this expression must follow on something else to make sense. It's like saying 'furthermore', 'also', etc.
     
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    Cathy Rose

    Senior Member
    United States English
    "What is more" sounds a little awkward to me, Faktum. I'd use Porteno's suggestions of "furthermore" or "also." "In addition" would work, too.
     

    Faktum

    Senior Member
    Norway
    Would the phrase "in addition" be a suitable substitute for "what is more." I like the word "furthermore" too, but I have already used that one in several sentences in my essay. Furthermore, I want to vary my language.
     

    Porteño

    Member Emeritus
    British English
    Would the phrase "in addition" be a suitable substitute for "what is more." I like the word "furthermore" too, but I have already used that one in several sentences in my essay. Furthermore, I want to vary my language.
    Yes, as Cathy Rose suggested. A lot will depend on the context. As I suggested 'also' is another alternative. Really it is a matter of personal style and/or preference or which 'sounds better'. As you probably know, this happens a lot in English.
     
    Last edited:

    dwm

    Member
    USA - English
    In the USA "what is more" would only be spoken, not written, and it would almost always be contracted into "what's more." However, even that would sound too formal in conversation these days.
     

    dwm

    Member
    USA - English
    Sorry, forgot to mention that of the suggestions already mentioned, I would personally use "in addition," though that's just me. "Furthermore" would definitely work especially if you're trying to sound very formal. But "also" sounds a little too informal to me.
     

    The Slippery Slide

    Senior Member
    British English
    I'm reviving this thread because it relates to something I'm double-checking at work right now.

    I go along with everything that's written above, but I'm editing something where I need to show the usage of what is more (rather than furthermore), and one example converts it into the past tense:

    "She was tired and, what was more, incredibly hungry."

    My sense is that it should always be "what is more", because it relates to the present telling of the story, rather than the past events. Any thoughts? (It's worth my double-checking things today, because yesterday I told my boss that a different grammar point was wrong, and she produced a grammar book that blew my argument out of the water.)
     

    Orange Blossom

    Senior Member
    U.S.A. English
    I've never seen the expression used without the contraction, only with the contraction.

    The contracted form, "What's more" eliminates the tense question and is what we would use.

    Orange Blossom
     
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