What is the difference between notes and references?

farhad_persona

Banned
Farsi
Hello,

So, I am writing this article and in the end and I want to add some references.

I asked my friend and he said you should have two parts: Notes where you mention the name of the books and References for the quotes from websites. For instance:


Regarded as pioneers of live music performance and renowned for their lavish stage shows, Pink Floyd also set high standards in sound quality, making use of innovative sound effects and quadraphonic speaker systems.[1]

In mid-1966, road manager Peter Wynne-Willson joined their road crew, and updated the band's lighting rig with some innovative ideas including the use of polarisers, mirrors and stretched condoms.[2]

Notes (name of the book that part was quoted from):

1.^The Inside Story of Pink Floyd

References (the address of website that part was taken from)
2.^http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pink_Floyd

..............................................................................

Is this the correct way?
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    I would say that notes are -> your comments and expansion of subjects in the body that would be a distraction and/or are incidental. Whereas references are sources from which facts or arguments have been culled.

    So in your passage, these are references

    1.^The Inside Story of Pink Floyd
    2.^http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pink_Floyd

    a note would be

    In mid-1966, road manager Peter Wynne-Willsona joined their road crew,

    awho had previously sailed round the world single-handed and conducted 16 times at Carnegie Hall.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    If I were writing an academic paper, I would have two sections. One would be for the 'notes' that go with specific sentences in the paper. Sometimes they are put at the bottom of the page on which the sentences appear; I call them 'footnotes'. Sometimes they are all listed together at the end of the paper; I call these 'endnotes'. They include page numbers, where that information is relevant. Sometimes they add extra information that is not part of the main paper.

    The other section would be a list of sources, which I believe you are calling 'references'. (I would call it the 'bibliography'.) These would list all the sources you used, whether or not you quoted them directly in the paper.

    It is likely that whoever you are writing this for in mind a specific format that you should use, and you should ask them what they want. However, if they don't, look for websites that explain the format for footnotes and bibliographies. (Search terms: footnotes bibliographies ) There are a lot of different ways to do this. Unless you have been told to use a specific one, just pick the one you like best and use it.

    Cross-posted with PaulQ.
     

    farhad_persona

    Banned
    Farsi
    If I were writing an academic paper, I would have two sections. One would be for the 'notes' that go with specific sentences in the paper. Sometimes they are put at the bottom of the page on which the sentences appear; I call them 'footnotes'. Sometimes they are all listed together at the end of the paper; I call these 'endnotes'. They include page numbers, where that information is relevant. Sometimes they add extra information that is not part of the main paper.

    The other section would be a list of sources, which I believe you are calling 'references'. (I would call it the 'bibliography'.) These would list all the sources you used, whether or not you quoted them directly in the paper.

    It is likely that whoever you are writing this for in mind a specific format that you should use, and you should ask them what they want. However, if they don't, look for websites that explain the format for footnotes and bibliographies. (Search terms: footnotes bibliographies ) There are a lot of different ways to do this. Unless you have been told to use a specific one, just pick the one you like best and use it.

    Cross-posted with PaulQ.
    Thank you and thank Paul.

    If I call the second section 'bibliography', then how about the websites I used for the article?
    For instance, I have used a piece of news from a news website and I want to mention it as one of my references. Can the address of that news website be included in bibliography?
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I have always put all sources in my 'bibliography', no matter what format they were in. Looking around the internet, it seems that is what other people are doing as well. However, it is always wise to check with the person you are writing for. If you are writing for yourself, you get to decide for yourself. :)

    If you cite a website, you have to include the information of when you got the information, as websites change over time. There are several possible formats to use. Once more, I suggest you look on the internet, and pick a format.

    Added: You could try this website: http://www.bibme.org/
    They say they'll format your bibliography for you. :)
    (I haven't tried it myself, so I can't say how it works.)
     
    Last edited:
    I agree with Cagey; your reference list should include 'net sources (with all the url's etc). POSSIBLY, these might be set up as a *section* of the reference list, the other being, I would guess, print sources. Reference lists sometimes have sections, e.g. 'primary sources,' or 'historical documents', or 'newpaper accounts.'

    A number of manuals recommend reference lists [or "Works Cited"], and reserve the term 'bibiography' for wider surveys of material (e.g., in a textbook, suggestions for students' further reading). A reference list included only works actually cited/used.

    In any case, 'notes' as Cagey stated, are different and represent comments and explanations of the text that would be distraction to include. The text says, "Florence Nightingale, in 1854, formed an ambulance corps.#" The Note # says, "At that time it was not called such, but was called the Medical Support Group." {Made up}
     
    Last edited:

    farhad_persona

    Banned
    Farsi
    I have always put all sources in my 'bibliography', no matter what format they were in. Looking around the internet, it seems that is what other people are doing as well. However, it is always wise to check with the person you are writing for. If you are writing for yourself, you get to decide for yourself. :)

    If you cite a website, you have to include the information of when you got the information, as websites change over time. There are several possible formats to use. Once more, I suggest you look on the internet, and pick a format.

    Added: You could try this website: http://www.bibme.org/
    They say they'll format your bibliography for you. :)
    (I haven't tried it myself, so I can't say how it works.)
    Should I add the date if it's a specific story like this:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/football/25647570

    If I quote from the page above and cite it as a reference, is including the date necessary?
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Farhad, if you're writing for publication, you should seek the guidance of your editor, since various publications and publishing houses have different rules and styles. If you're writing an academic dissertation or thesis, your faculty adviser can tell you what style is favored by your university.
     
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