What is the etymology of the Indic word, daku?

asjar

New Member
Urdu, Punjabi
I ask because Internet sources state that it comes from the Hindustani word, dakait. However, as Hindustani has words from Sanskrit and Arabic. I was wondering whether dakait is taken from the Arabic word for banditry: qatie
 
  • Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    ^ Someone with a knowledge of the etymology of the word ڈاکو Daakuu will be in a better position to answer your question. However, just a couple of points.

    i) You will have noticed that the first constant ڈ does not exist in the Arabic alphabet. Its sound is NOT the same as the letter د

    ii) Google translate gives the meaning of "banditry" in Arabic as قطع الطرق . You will see that the equivalent Urdu word has no resemblance to the Arabic word whatsoever. And the Urdu word for "banditry" is ڈکیتی Daketii.
     

    Alfaaz

    Senior Member
    English
    Addition: قاطِع ُ الطَّرِیق is present (along with جمع: قُطاع) in Urdu as well as a possible synonym for ڈاکُو - Daakuu and ڈَکَیت - Dakait (audio examples of the pronunciations are available for these two words). Both Urdu Lughat and Platts suggest Sanskrit and/or Prakrit as the possible origin(s):
    H ڐاکو डाकू ḍākū [Prk. डक्कुओ, डक्कुउ; S. दंष्टृ+कः], s.m. One of a gang of robbers, a 'dacoit,' robber, highwayman, freebooter, pirate (=ḍakait; syn. baṭ-pāṛ).
    H ڐکيت डकैत ḍakait [ḍākā, q.v.+ait = āʼit = Prk. आइत्तो=आयंतो=आवेंतो=S. आपयन्, the term. of the pres. part. with the caus. aug. āpi], s.m. One of a gang of robbers, a 'dacoit,' robber, brigand, highwayman, pirate (=ḍākū).
    H ڐکيتي डकैती ḍakaitī [the preceding+ī = Prk. इआ=S. इका], s.f. Gang-robbery, 'dacoity,' highway-robbery, robbery, piracy.
    Etymology experts could provide further information.
     

    fdb

    Senior Member
    French (France)
    The entry in Turner:

    5543 *ḍākka1 ʻ robber, robbery ʼ. [Ac. to W.Wüst RM 3, 33, with *ṭhakk -- 2, ← non -- Aryan adaptation of śāka -- ]
    P. ḍākā m. ʻ robbery, band of robbers ʼ, ḍākū m. ʻ robber ʼ; N. ḍāku, ḍã̄kā, ˚ku, ḍakait ʻ robber ʼ, A. B. ḍāku, ḍakāit, Or. ḍāku, ḍã̄ku, ḍakāita, Mth. ḍākū, ḍakait; H. ḍākā, m. ʻ robbery, band of robbers ʼ, ḍākū, ḍã̄kū, ḍakait m. ʻ robber ʼ; G. ḍākɔ m. ʻ attack by robbers ʼ; M. ḍã̄kā m. ʻ band of robbers, attack by robbers ʼ; -- G. ḍākũ ʻ dishonoured ʼ, ḍākiyũ, ḍākṇũ ʻ wicked ʼ (or < ḍākínī -- ).

    That is: from a hypothetical Sanskrit *ḍākka. Not perhaps enormously useful.
     

    Lugubert

    Senior Member
    I agree with fdb. I can't find any "dashtaka" in Monier-Williams' dictionaries, however I interpret the transcription. If the "d" really is supposed to be a द, it seems strange if it would develop into a ड (ḍ).
     

    asjar

    New Member
    Urdu, Punjabi
    I agree with fdb. I can't find any "dashtaka" in Monier-Williams' dictionaries, however I interpret the transcription. If the "d" really is supposed to be a द, it seems strange if it would develop into a ड (ḍ).
    Yes, I have checked Monier-Williams as well and to no avail. I have also checked ḍākka and it too does not show up.
     
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