what is the reason in.

yakor

Senior Member
Russian
Hi! How could one tell the thought in other words?
"I don't know why he did it"
1)I don't know the reason why he did it.
2a)I don't know what is the reason in that he did it.
2b)I don't know what is the reason in he did it.
2c) I don't know the reason of why he did it.
3)What is the reason in he did it?
4) What is the reason in that he did it?
5) In what is the reason that he did it?
Do 3) and 4) have sense? Are they possible in English speech at all?
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    "I don't know why he did it"
    1)I don't know the reason why he did it.
    This version is normal but wordy. "Why" should be enough without "reason".
    2a)I don't know what is the reason in that he did it.
    This one is odd. "In" is particularly weird in this sentence.
    2b)I don't know what is the reason in he did it.
    Wordy and odd. Once again, "in" seems out of place.
    2c) I don't know the reason of why he did it.
    There is no reason to use "of" before "why".
    3)What is the reason in he did it?
    "What is his reason for doing it?" Or: "Why did he do it?"
    4) What is the reason in that he did it?
    You should forget about "in" in these questions. It is unnatural and confusing.
    5) In what is the reason that he did it?
    This one doesn't make any sense at all.

    I get the idea that you are just stringing words together and hoping that they make sense, yakor. That isn't a good approach to learning how to formulate questions. Why don't you copy the questions of fluent English-speakers? That would be a fast way for you to learn how to formulate normal questions. :)
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    All the ones with "in" are incorrect (2a, 2b, 3, 4, 5).
    2c) "of" is incorrect.
    That leaves 1 and the original. "The reason why" is slightly redundant though it is used (i.e. "the reason" and "why" both work alone with the same meaning).
     

    yakor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I get the idea that you are just stringing words together and hoping that they make sense, yakor. :)
    Thanks. No, Im just trying to sense the language by this way. It has some sense for me. All ways are good.
    But you could ask,"What is the reason in?" or "What is the reason in it?" or "In what is the reason?"? Or it makes no sense too?
     

    yakor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Do you ask, "What is the reason in"?
    The reason is in your misunderstanding my point of view...
    Do you use "in" in questions with "reason"?
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    No. We do not ask "What is the reason in?" to mean "What is the reason?" The reason is not something in a container.
    What is the apple in? The apple is in the box.
    What is the reason (that) we don't say "What is the reason in"?
    The reason is (that) we don't say "What is the reason in?"
     

    bennymix

    Senior Member
    Yakor,
    "What is the reason in it?"
    Occasionally something like this is said, and is applicable, but not the kinds of cases you are asking about.

    If the issue is sanity, and Joe lost his mind and burned down his own house, we might say, "There was no reason [i.e. sanity] in what he did." Or "He burned down his own house. I see no reason in such an act."

    ---
    I agree with other posters above (Owl and Myr, in particular): All your formulations are defective, except 1) which is merely wordy. 3) and 4) make no sense. As stated by others, your use of 'in' creates fatal problems in all cases (contrast with my examples, above).
     
    Last edited:

    yakor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    ...we might say, "There was no reason [i.e. sanity] in what he did." Or "He burned down his own house. I see no reason in such an act."
    Yes, I see it. We, also, use the word "reason"(this word sounds like "rezon" in Russian) like that, with the preposition.
    Notice, that "reason" in this meaning is not something one could put into a basket or a bag)))
     
    Last edited:

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Notice, that "reason" in this meaning is not something one could put into a basket or a bag)))
    But we do say it is "in <something>," not just "in".
    I see no reason in such an act.
    What was the reason in his actions? :tick:
    What was the reason in? :cross: is still wrong.
     
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