What o'clock is it?/What is the time?/What time is it?

Larana

New Member
Español
Hello everybody!
¡Hola a todos!

Me acabo de encontrar con la frase "what o'clock is it?" y no estoy segura de su traducción, ¿acaso es más coloquial? Yo ya conocía "what time is it?" y "what's the time?", pero no sé qué diferencia puede haber entre estas dos y "what o'clock is it?". Que yo sepa en español solo decimos "¿qué hora es?".

Muchas gracias por la ayuda :)

I've just found the sentence "what o'clock is it?" and I'm not sure about how to translate it. Is it, maybe, more colloquial? I already knew "what time is it?" and "what's the time?", but I don't know the difference between these ones and "what o'clock is it?". As far as I know in Spanish we only say "¿qué hora es?".

Thank you very much for your help :)
 
  • Rastnim88

    Senior Member
    British English
    No es coloquial. Sería "what's that time?" o "do/does you/anybody have the time?" Nunca he utilizado esta frase, pero la entiendo. Me parece como algo que las clases altas dirían, puedo imaginar a la Reina de Inglaterra diciendo que, "what o'clock is it?" jaja! Me gusta mucho, de hecho, quizás yo empiece a usarla!

    Significa, "que hora es?" pero está mezclando con la repuesta, "it's 3 o'clock"

    Dijiste que solo usais "que hora es? No dices, "tienes hora?" también?
     

    sandpiperlily

    Senior Member
    No es coloquial. Sería "what's that time?" o "do/does you/anybody have the time?" Nunca he utilizado esta frase, pero la entiendo. Me parece como algo que las clases altas dirían, puedo imaginar a la Reina de Inglaterra diciendo que, "what o'clock is it?" jaja! Me gusta mucho, de hecho, quizás yo empiece a usarla!
    Haha, that's what I thought, too! I've never heard anybody say this, and it sounds quite quaint to me.
     

    Larana

    New Member
    Español
    Thank you! :D
    Your example was perfect!
    In fact I forgot adding a context, I found it in Dicken's "A Christmas Carol" so I think that this expression rather fits in the language spoken in 1843. Your explanation made me become aware of that.

    Of course we say "qué hora tienes?" in Spanish, but I was interested in impersonal sentences.

    Thank you again!
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    I found it in Dicken's "A Christmas Carol" so I think that this expression rather fits in the language spoken in 1843.

    Of course we say "qué hora tienes?" in Spanish, but I was interested in impersonal sentences.
    This phrase is extinct in modern English, but just for your reference (although you may know it), "o'clock" is short for "on the clock," so grammatically the phrase works fine, although it sounds very odd today.

    As for "¿Qué hora tienes?," that would more accurately be translated as "What time do you have?," meaning "What time does your watch show?" On the other hand, all the phrases in the thread title translate to "¿Qué hora es?"

    No es coloquial. Sería "what's that time?" o "do/does you/anybody have the time?"
    Pretty sure your "what's that time?" is a typo for "what's the time?"
     

    Archilochus

    Senior Member
    American English
    "This phrase is extinct in modern English"

    Yes it is. I wasn't aware of the Dickens instance, and the only place I recall ever seeing it used is here:

    KING RICHARD III
    Richmond! When last I was at Exeter,
    The mayor in courtesy show'd me the castle,
    And call'd it Rougemont: at which name I started,
    Because a bard of Ireland told me once
    I should not live long after I saw Richmond.

    BUCKINGHAM
    My Lord!

    KING RICHARD III
    Ay, what's o'clock?

    BUCKINGHAM
    I am thus bold to put your grace in mind
    Of what you promised me.

    KING RICHARD III
    Well, but what's o'clock?

    BUCKINGHAM
    Upon the stroke of ten.
     

    jdelhard

    New Member
    Dominican Spanish
    "This phrase is extinct in modern English"

    Yes it is. I wasn't aware of the Dickens instance, and the only place I recall ever seeing it used is here:

    BUCKINGHAM
    My Lord!

    KING RICHARD III
    Ay, what's o'clock?

    BUCKINGHAM
    Upon the stroke of ten.
    I just got another example of this phrase. It is from Christian Hans Andersen's "The Galoshes of Fortune":

    “What is it o’clock, watchman?” inquired a passenger. But there was no answer from the watchman.
     
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