"What was cloudy now is clear." Is 'what was cloudy' a noun clause?

oilwr

New Member
Thai
Is it a noun clause or other grammar points? Please explain for me.

Thank you very much
 
  • SReynolds

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    I don't think it is a noun clause, because it's not a separate and separable part of the sentence. You can reword the sentences to sound more like clauses but they're still inseparable:

    What was cloudy is now clear. = That which was cloudy is now clear.
    What doesn't kill you makes you stronger. = That which doesn't kill you makes you stronger.
    He who knows does not speak. (I don't think you can reword this one without making the whole thing unintelligible.)

    I did some research and apparently it's not clear whether this construction can be called a noun clause.
     
    I'm not sure is 'separability' is a proper test. When clauses are analyzed, there are words implied and these can be filled in. So the filled-out clause might be separable (make sense), but the clause as such can't stand alone.

    I wasn't able to see her play the piano.

    I don't think it is a noun clause, because it's not a separate and separable part of the sentence. You can reword the sentences to sound more like clauses but they're still inseparable:

    What was cloudy is now clear. = That which was cloudy is now clear.
    What doesn't kill you makes you stronger. = That which doesn't kill you makes you stronger.
    He who knows does not speak. (I don't think you can reword this one without making the whole thing unintelligible.)

    I did some research and apparently it's not clear whether this construction can be called a noun clause.
     
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