... what will let me work ...

carlox

Member
Spanish, Spain
Hi everybody!

I recently came across with a CV motivation letter including a line:

I will be delighted to be assigned in one of your centres, what will let me work in a rewarding working environment.

Hovewer, I can't why what is used. I'd rather say it like this:

... of your centers, in which I will be working in a rewarding environment.

Any other idea as to how this notion can be expressed will be appreciated. Anyway, the use of what instead of which is incorrect in this context, isn't it?

Thanks in advance.
CARLOS.
 
  • jdenson

    Senior Member
    USA / English
    Hi everybody!

    I recently came across with a CV motivation letter including a line:

    I will would be delighted to be assigned in to one of your centres, what will let me in which I could work in a rewarding working environment.

    Hovewer, I can't why what is used. I'd rather say it like this:

    ... of your centers, in which I will be working in a rewarding environment.

    Any other idea as to how this notion can be expressed will be appreciated. Anyway, the use of what instead of which is incorrect in this context, isn't it?

    Thanks in advance.
    CARLOS.
    There's more than one problem with this sentence.
     

    Joelline

    Senior Member
    American English
    The use of "what" is very awkward; the following is a bit smoother and more common: I would be delighted to be assigned in one of your centres where I could work in a rewarding environment.
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Since this is a job application for a job that has not yet been attained, it could be:

    I will would be delighted to be assigned in to one of your centres, what will let which would allow me to work in a rewarding working environment.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    I will would be delighted to be assigned in to one of your centres, what will let which would allow me to work in a rewarding working environment.
    Such constructions are common colloquially, and are increasingly seen in the written language too, but they should be avoided because "which" doesn't have a clear antecedent.

    My suggestion:

    I would be delighted to be assigned to one of your centers and have the opportunity to work in a rewarding environment.
     

    danielfranco

    Senior Member
    "What with the rewarding environment in which I would work, I would simply love to work with y'all in one of your center thingies," you might hear some people say.
    But.
    It is a rather awkward (as in, inept) way of saying what Elroy said rather directly and simply.
     

    jdenson

    Senior Member
    USA / English
    The use of "what" is very awkward; the following is a bit smoother and more common: I would be delighted to be assigned in one of your centres where I could work in a rewarding environment.
    Joelline is being far too diplomatic. In, "I will be delighted to be assigned in one of your centres, what will let me work in a rewarding working environment.", the word "what" is not awkward, it is illiterate.
    JD
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Joelline is being far too diplomatic. In, "I will be delighted to be assigned in one of your centres, what will let me work in a rewarding working environment.", the word "what" is not awkward, it is illiterate.
    JD
    And you're being far too judgmental.

    Yes, it's incorrect, but it's a classical translation problem, not a mark of illiteracy.
     

    jdenson

    Senior Member
    USA / English
    And you're being far too judgmental.

    Yes, it's incorrect, but it's a classical translation problem, not a mark of illiteracy.
    I did not mean to imply that the person struggling with this translation is illiterate. The fact remains, however, that a native speaker, reading the sentence in question, will assume that the writer is illiterate.
    It ill-serves that struggling translator to say that his sentence is "awkward", when, in fact, it is wrong.
    JD
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Yes, what's wrong is wrong - I just found the word "illiterate" a little too harsh.

    But your point is well made.
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Joelline is being far too diplomatic. In, "I will be delighted to be assigned in one of your centres, what will let me work in a rewarding working environment.", the word "what" is not awkward, it is illiterate.
    JD
    If you had said that "what" is simply wrong, I would agree. It is far more than awkward.

    Your suggestions about how to correct problems are excellent.

    However, I would prefer not to see the word "illiterate" used when making comments about the English written by those who are learning our language and who are asking for our help in this forum.

    Gaer
     

    jabogitlu

    Senior Member
    USA-English
    I also disagree that it's illiterate, because I know many people within my dialectal area that would use precisely this construction!
     

    danielfranco

    Senior Member
    I often hear people use the expression I wrote in my other post (or similar ones). What with me living in the region I live, it shouldn't surprise anyone too much, should it?
    So, it is incorrect ("wrong" is also judgmental, ain't it?) in certain areas of the world, but not in all of them, it seems.
    The use of the word "what" as in the example sentence above might be awkward in those regions of the world where it is considered incorrect, especially if you're used to speak in such a manner.
    But for anyone interested in learning Standard English (is it capitalized? Can't quite remember...), be advised to avoid similar constructions.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    No, your formulation is not wrong. The one in the first post is.

    "Wrong" is not judgmental. It refers to the sentence and its perceived correctness, and does not make reference to the writer's level of education.
     

    jdenson

    Senior Member
    USA / English
    If you had said that "what" is simply wrong, I would agree. It is far more than awkward.

    Your suggestions about how to correct problems are excellent.

    However, I would prefer not to see the word "illiterate" used when making comments about the English written by those who are learning our language and who are asking for our help in this forum.

    Gaer
    Hi Gaer,
    My use of the word "illiterate" was most certainly not directed at "those who are learning our language and who are asking for our help in this forum." I am indeed sorry if I gave that impression. Please keep in mind that the original poster said that he ran across the sentence in a "CV motivation letter" and that he, himself, thought that it was wrong.
    Among the definitions of "illiterate" to be found in The American Heritage Dictionary are: 2. a. Marked by inferiority to an expected standard of familiarity with language and literature. b. violating prescribed standards of speech or writing. Accordingly, the use of "what" instead of "which", in the sentence under consideration, is surely illiterate.
    JD
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Yes, that's the dictionary definition, but in practice the word is loaded with judgmental connotations.

    You could have just as easily said "incorrect." :)
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top