what you think to be the case on climate change

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koper2

Senior Member
Polish
I think you need to say exactly what you think to be the case on climate change.
From fraze.it website.

Is the complement of the verb "to say" an indirect question in the sentence above? Is its direct counterpart What do you think to be the case on climate change??
 
  • Chez

    Senior Member
    English English
    I don't think it's a case of being an indirect question. To simplify, you could say: I think you need to say what you think on climate change.

    So it's not really an indirect question, it's just saying 'you ought to say what you think'. It is the speaker's opinion that the person should say what he thinks.
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    What curious English (what you think to be). This construction is presumably modelled on the question what do you consider to be ...?
    It's not something I can find in the British National Corpus.

    Why is it used instead of what you think is?
    It's an indirect question, analysed as follows: I think you need to say what in your opinion is the case for climate change.
     

    Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    As an alternative to calling it an indirect question,
    think of "what" (here) as representing "that which":
    In "Say that which you think" you have a relative clause.
     
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