What's a budding iron?

susanna76

Senior Member
Romanian
Hi,

Here's from Edwardian Farm (the book):
"Using a long knife, a budding iron and a turf iron, the peat was neatly cut into blocks 20 inches deep, 14 wide and 2 inches thick."

I couldn't find much of help online.

Thank you in advance! I love this program, and am trying to read the book as well.
 
  • Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    They look like this. Picture

    You can read more here

    The top layer of soil and vegetation would then be removed by the cutter standing in the tie and slicing horizontally into the peat face. This would be done by using a Devon spade for shallow depths or a 'budding iron', sometimes known as a 'spending ire', for deeper depths, this was a type of shovel but it had a triangular, flatter head with a straight handle. http://www.legendarydartmoor.co.uk/peat_moor.htm


    Try using the search term

    "budding iron" turf
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It makes sense now (also why it's called "budding'). Thank you, Biffo!
    I suspect that it comes from an archaic meaning of the verb "to bud".

    bud (n.) late 14c., budde, origin unknown, perhaps from Old French boter "push forward, thrust,"
    http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?allowed_in_frame=0&search=bud&searchmode=none

    Maybe it is a "thrusting iron". I don't know. it's just a guess. You could try posting in the Etymology, History of languages and Linguistics (EHL) forum.
     
    Last edited:

    susanna76

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Yes, that's what I thought, too, intuitively. I just assumed there was such a verb because it sounded like what you say :)
     
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