whats the difference between internet bar and internet cafe?

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Leon_Zhu

Member
Chinese - China
my title of thread is one question and also I have another to ask:

as far I know in English countries such as Australia, most places where you pay for using computers over a period of time provides nice service (snack and drinks) and quiet environment. But in China, this kind of place is often crowded with people(usually including children) and it is ok that they yell and shout loud and smoke there. so I think internet bar or cafe is not suitable for this case because both they sound like elegant places.

so is there a better word to describe such a place? can I say "internet market"? thanks in advance :)
 
  • Chez

    Senior Member
    English English
    Well, internet bars and cafes are not necessarily elegant. They can be very scruffy.

    Another possibility in the UK is an 'internet shop' (I don't know if they would use 'internet store' in the US). Maybe that sounds less elegant to you? It certainly puts less emphasis on the place selling you coffee, food or drinks. It suggests just a lot of computers that you can use by the hour for money.
     

    Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    Nothing about "internet café" sounds especially classy to me. It's the phrase I would use.

    And, Chez, "internet store" definitely sounds confusing and wrong to this American.
     

    Leon_Zhu

    Member
    Chinese - China
    Well, internet bars and cafes are not necessarily elegant. They can be very scruffy.

    Another possibility in the UK is an 'internet shop' (I don't know if they would use 'internet store' in the US). Maybe that sounds less elegant to you? It certainly puts less emphasis on the place selling you coffee, food or drinks. It suggests just a lot of computers that you can use by the hour for money.
    oh really, ok then I consider these places in China as internet shop, since they are not that elegant at all. thanks Chez:)
     

    Leon_Zhu

    Member
    Chinese - China
    Nothing about "internet café" sounds especially classy to me. It's the phrase I would use.

    And, Chez, "internet store" definitely sounds confusing and wrong to this American.
    oh really, since these places in China are full of smokes and ashs so I guess, maybe I have a wrong impression of that in Australia. thanks:)
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    Hi Leon, Do you pay a fee when you go into these shops? Or, do they make money selling food and drinks, etc.?

    My experience is that Internet cafes have slowly died out in the USA since most regular because most cafes and restaurants offer free WiFi, even Subway!
     

    Leon_Zhu

    Member
    Chinese - China
    Hi Leon, Do you pay a fee when you go into these shops? Or, do they make money selling food and drinks, etc.?

    My experience is that Internet cafes have slowly died out in the USA since most regular because most cafes and restaurants offer free WiFi, even Subway!
    hi perpend :) the places I was talking about mainly earn money by letting people use computers for hours, but they also sell snacks or non-alcohol drinks to people using computers there. and most people (mostly children) go there for playing multiplayer games with friends, not doing something related to work. so I think this kind of place may be a little different from that in your country but I cannot find better word to describe it other than internet cafe. and now they are all over the China because some familities still cannot afford high-configuration personal computers for games or some other reasons.

    thats good America provides a good public service like this :) some restaurants also provide these services but they just take up a small part of all.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    Oh---thanks much for the added input/context, Leon. It's interesting for me culturally!

    This does sound like a cultural phenomenon, and Chez's "Internet Shop" works in American English. I'll brainstorm to think of maybe another term.
     
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