What's the word for 'being in charge' in this context

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nagomi

Senior Member
Korean
"Samsung dispatched employees and executives who are in charge of the project to Japan." Obviously, employees are not the one in charge. It means they are 'involved' in the project.

There are always working-level people who actually handle tasks at the front end where they meet with clients. And there is someone who is 'in charge'. In my language, this expression is always used for both of them. For example, at a service center, the one who actually meet with a customer and the one fixes his/her cell phone and even their manager, are all called 'in charge'. But in the English language, someone in charge is always the decision maker, not the rank and file employees. How do you call them who are at the front end or near there?
 
  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    A person who's job is meeting with customers might be called a "customer service" employee/representative. They make some decisions.

    A person whose job is fixing electronic devices might be called a "technician".

    A person whose job is supervising other employees is called a "manager".

    But in the English language, someone in charge is always the decision maker, not the rank and file employees.
    That statement is misleading. Nobody can make all the decisions except the company President/CEO. Everyone below the CEO can make some decisions, while other decisions are made "above them" or "below them" by others.

    Usually "in charge of" means "responsible for". If I am in charge of a project, I run that project. I tell people (who are on the project) what to do. But I don't make all the decisions. For example: the project needs more money or more people. My job is to explain that problem to my boss and request the money. I cannot make the decision "the company will spend more moneyu".
     
    Last edited:
    Nagomi--Your post seems to relate to the term 'in charge,' which you contrast with 'front end'. An odd contrast.

    But also you give no context; for example, those at the 'front end' (your term) in the army are called the foot soldiers, and the term is also used metaphorically for the minions who actually work.

    One needs more explanation as to what you want.
     

    nagomi

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Let me re-phrase my question. How do you indicate the person who a customer needs to talk about a certain task? In my language, we say 'a person responsible/in charge', but 'in charge' or 'responsible' don't seem to very fit from the way I see it. Because those two terms seem too big. This employee have not either caused or have the ability to make a decision, but he's just a working-level officer who meets the customers and hear from them, and guide them through the procedures for them to get what they need.

    A: I've got my phone broken. Who do I need to talk to?
    B: Let me give you [ ]'s number.

    What would be an appropriate pronoun that can suit in the blanket?
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    A: I've got my phone broken. Who do I need to talk to?
    B: Let me give you [ ]'s number.
    In the US, each store has its own title. There is no standard word.
    In this example, the <title> is named "Susan". So B might reply:

    B: Susan handles that.
    B: Susan works with problems like that.
    B: Susan does that.
    B: Our <title> does that.
    B: You need to speak with our <title>.
    B: Susan diagnoses phone problem.
     
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