wheeling earth

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hhtt

Senior Member
Turkish
But this is only the surface of the landscape. Below all this is the earth itself, of various contours, compositions and textures. Beneath all this is the pulse of life, not merely in the butterfly hovering on the flower, the rabbit nibbling in the thicket, the cow grazing in the meadow, or the farmer cutting his hay, but also in the rootlets pushing through the dark loam and in the bacteria, molds, and myriad small life filling all the crevices of land and sea. Above shines the warm sun on the wheeling earth in the ever-changing sky."

What does wheeling earth mean in the above?

Source: Understanding Chemistry by Lawrence P. Lessing.

Thank you.
 
  • The definition in your dictionary that applies is this one:
    Turn or seem to turn on an axis or pivot.
    "The earth" is the planet on which you and I (and everyone else) are located. I would be very surprised if you did not know that the earth rotates on its axis as it revolves around the sun.
     

    hhtt

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    The definition in your dictionary that applies is this one:

    "The earth" is the planet on which you and I (and everyone else) are located. I would be very surprised if you did not know that the earth rotates on its axis as it revolves around the sun.
    I know but there is a conceptual confusion. Are not earth and world different concepts and it is the world, not earth, that rotates both on its axis and around the Sun? And some more questions have arised now.

    Thank you.
     
    I know but there is a conceptual confusion. Are not earth and world different concepts
    No. As used here, they are exactly the same concept.

    and it is the world, not earth, that rotates both on its axis and around the Sun?
    I would describe myself as a highly-educated and knowledgeable native English speaker, and I have already told you what a native English speaker would say (that is, we call the planet on which we stand "the earth".) However, if you believe that your knowledge and command of English are superior to my own, and that I am ignorant and what I tell you is wrong, then you may feel free to disregard everything I tell you.

    And some more questions have arised now.
    There is no such word in English as "arised." The past participle of "arise" is "arisen." But of course, if you think that your knowledge and command of English are superior to my own, and that I am ignorant and what I tell you is wrong, then you may feel free to disregard everything I tell you.
     

    hhtt

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    No. As used here, they are exactly the same concept.


    I would describe myself as a highly-educated and knowledgeable native English speaker, and I have already told you what a native English speaker would say (that is, we call the planet on which we stand "the earth".) However, if you believe that your knowledge and command of English are superior to my own, and that I am ignorant and what I tell you is wrong, then you may feel free to disregard everything I tell you.


    There is no such word in English as "arised." The past participle of "arise" is "arisen." But of course, if you think that your knowledge and command of English are superior to my own, and that I am ignorant and what I tell you is wrong, then you may feel free to disregard everything I tell you.
    Why do you think I don't believe what you write. I only said I confused the concepts world and earth. Confusions are not about you or your English.

    Thank you.
     

    hhtt

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    The definition in your dictionary that applies is this one:

    "The earth" is the planet on which you and I (and everyone else) are located. I would be very surprised if you did not know that the earth rotates on its axis as it revolves around the sun.
    Are revolve and rotate different verbs in meaning? According to 1 they are the same but according to 2, they are not.

    Thank you.
     
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