When a Portuguese and a Brazilian hold a conversation,

terredepomme

Senior Member
Korean
Would they speak to each other in their own version of portuguese, or would the portuguese make the effort to speak in br-pt when they are in Brazil, and vice versa? What if they are in a non-lusophone country?
For example in British or American English there are virtually no grammatical differences, just a few lexical, orthographic ones(and the pronunciation, obviously) so each of them would speak in their own English.
As for French, although colloquial Québec French can be phonetically, lexically, and even grammatically different from European French,(c'est-tu, dis-moi pas, etc) they are never considered as standard (no TV announcers would speak like that) so Québec people don't generally speak in such manner to other francophones, unless they were in Québec.
But since the Brazilian and European Portugese, despite being completely mutually intelligible, have major grammatical differences, and at the same time each of them is considered just as "standard" as the other, I wonder how it would be done.
For example, when a Brazilian befriends a Portuguese, will he call him as "você" or "tu?"
 
  • Carfer

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Portugal
    I'd say most people would try to use their own variant and resort to the other one only if they are not actually understood. It happens sometimes, specially on the Brazilian side, because the Portuguese variant is more difficult to understand for a untrained ear. Many of our vowels are pronounced closed or even mute, so they are more difficult to understand. Besides, I believe Brazilians are less exposed to the Portuguese variant than we are to the Brazilian one. Grammatical differences are of no special concern, they don't prevent communication and intelligibility. Lexical differences may be troublesome in a few circumstances, but it's really a very minor problem, specially on the Portuguese side, as we are used to hear the Brazilian variant by way of television. I wouldn't say it is really significant.
    As to 'tu' and 'você', I'd probably use 'você', not specifically because the other person is Brazilian, but because we also use 'você' along with 'tu'. Besides, as a rule, the Portuguese are quite adaptive and start using other people languages and adopting their ways of life in no time.
     

    machadinho

    Senior Member
    Português do Brasil
    Major grammatical differences? I don't think so. Would you mind naming some of them?

    I've been to Portugal lately, and yes I tried not to use "você" and employed the ∅ pronoun instead as much as I could. But that was the only language caveat I imposed upon myself.
     
    Last edited:

    Myla

    Member
    Brazilian Portuguese
    Everytime I talked to a Portuguese person, I always used my own way of speaking.
    I would never try to use "tu" or use "estou a fazer" instead of "estou fazendo" because Im not used to it, and we know that they can understand. The language is the same and there is no point in changing just because the other speaks in a different way.

    BUT, of course, it depends on the intonation, on the accent, and the manner the person speaks. There are some different words, and in this case, we would have some difficulties, but we try to make ourselves understood because of the context.

    What we can do to avoid misunderstanding is maybe try to speak slower and clearer, because the accent is very different from each other.

    Portuguese people usually speak very fast and they dont pronounce all the 'vowels', which is a little strange for us, but I dont think they change their manners of speaking when they talk to Brazilians....
     

    Macunaíma

    Senior Member
    português, Brasil
    The Portuguese are always surprised when they hear from Brazilians they speak too fast :). It's an impression we get because of the muted vowels - we only leave out certain vowels when we are speaking really, really fast.

    And, to answer the original post, I'd only try not to use slang and expressions I know to be regional when speaking to someone from Portugal. Other than that, I don't think we'd have any problem understanding each other perfectly well.
     

    Joca

    Senior Member
    Brazilian Portuguese
    By the way, it's been a long time since I last spoke to a Portuguese. Yet, I live in a town where the local/native people speak with an accent heavily influenced by the Azorian dialect. At times I could swear I am hearing European Portuguese, so to say.

    I sometimes wish I could talk to Portuguese members from this forum on Skype, but I know, I know, this is totally off-topic and I may get punished for simply expressing this wishful thought. :D
     

    machadinho

    Senior Member
    Português do Brasil
    In Portugal, I always use 3rd person (você), with everybody but children, because they use to look at you pretty amazed, when you talk to them in the 3rd person...
    Cute! But what do you say when you are talking to 2+of them?
     

    Carfer

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Portugal
    I live in a town where the local/native people speak with an accent heavily influenced by the Azorian dialect. At times I could swear I am hearing European Portuguese, so to say.
    That's quite another matter. Actually the Azorian pronounciation is not the best example of how the Portuguese in general speak. S. Miguel Island pronounciation, for instance, is almost incomprehensible. The last time I was there, both my son and his Brazilian fiancee asked me why the cab driver was speaking in French (none of them has more than a rudimentary knowledge of French though).
     

    anaczz

    Senior Member
    Português (Brasil)
    Cute! But what do you say when you are talking to 2+of them?
    Bem, uma vez que eu vivia em Portugal, adotei o "vosso" (mesmo com adultos) pois é realmente muito prático. Usava bastante também o "consigo" (-Traga seu cartão sempre consigo) e muitos outros termos locais. O "pois" não consegui abandonar até hoje e já "contaminei" muitos brasileiros com ele. ;)
     

    englishmania

    Senior Member
    Português Europeu
    Joca, if you want to listen to standard EuPT, you can always check RTP , SIC, ...

    Bem, uma vez que eu vivia em Portugal, adotei o "vosso" (mesmo com adultos) pois é realmente muito prático. Usava bastante também o "consigo" (-Traga seu cartão sempre consigo) e muitos outros termos locais. O "pois" não consegui abandonar até hoje e já "contaminei" muitos brasileiros com ele. ;)
    Hehe.

    For example, when a Brazilian befriends a Portuguese, will he call him as "você" or "tu?"
    Se um brasileiro (que mantém ainda a pronúncia brasileira) vier a Portugal, acho que deve continuar a usar o "você". Reconhecemo-lo naturalmente e não nos causa estranheza. Talvez soe mais estranho se um brasileiro tentar falar à português e misturar diferentes formas e sotaques.
     
    Last edited:

    machadinho

    Senior Member
    Português do Brasil
    Bem, uma vez que eu vivia em Portugal, adotei o "vosso" (mesmo com adultos) pois é realmente muito prático. Usava bastante também o "consigo" (-Traga seu cartão sempre consigo) e muitos outros termos locais. O "pois" não consegui abandonar até hoje e já "contaminei" muitos brasileiros com ele. ;)
    Pois. O "vosso" como pronome possessivo, admito que soa até mais elegante que o "de vocês". Mas qual pronome reto você usava ao se dirigir a mais de uma criança ao mesmo tempo?
     

    Myla

    Member
    Brazilian Portuguese
    It's funny that it is a Portuguese thread, there are about 99% of portuguese speakers in it (except the Korean guy who asked the question - but I bet he can also understand at least a bit of Portuguese) and we are all writing in English...


    Anyway, I guess if I went to Portugal one day, I would try not to use Brazilian slangs... but Im sure I would have some problems in understanding the european portuguese....I would tell them to speak slower all the time... hehe
     

    Myla

    Member
    Brazilian Portuguese
    Ahhh, enquanto estava digitando o meu texto acima vocês mudaram pra português!!!!
    Ótimo!
     

    Joca

    Senior Member
    Brazilian Portuguese
    It's funny that it is a Portuguese thread, there are about 99% of portuguese speakers in it (except the Korean guy who asked the question - but I bet he can also understand at least a bit of Portuguese) and we are all writing in English...


    Anyway, I guess if I went to Portugal one day, I would try not to use Brazilian slangs... but Im sure I would have some problems in understanding the european portuguese....I would tell them to speak slower all the time... hehe
    Também achei isto muito ... estranho, hehehe

    Or should I say: Very weird! LOL
     

    Myla

    Member
    Brazilian Portuguese
    Aos brasileiros.... já colocaram o facebook em português europeu?? Foi engraçado clicar "gostar" no lugar de "curtir", fora outras diferenças!!
     

    Istriano

    Senior Member
    Croatian
    Normalmente a gente fala em português brasileiro, e eles respondem em português lusitano.

    Não tive problemas em Portugal.
    É mais fácil entender portugueses quando falam com você diretamente do que (tentar) entender
    a língua falada usada nos filmes portugueses e nas novelas lusas.
     

    Istriano

    Senior Member
    Croatian
    Aos brasileiros.... já colocaram o facebook em português europeu?? Foi engraçado clicar "gostar" no lugar de "curtir", fora outras diferenças!!
    Que eu saiba curtir se usa em Portugal, mas num registro mais ''inferior'', ou seja, se considera ''gíria popular'' e não uma forma ''geral, coloquial'' como no Brasil.
     

    Istriano

    Senior Member
    Croatian
    In Portugal, I always use 3rd person (você), with everybody but children, because they use to look at you pretty amazed, when you talk to them in 3rd person...
    ;)
    But in Algarve, they use 3rd person imperatives with children:

    M'nino, coma est' p'xinho.
    ;)
     

    machadinho

    Senior Member
    Português do Brasil
    Quando começamos a dizer "estou fazendo", "estava vindo"? Foi por influência da cultura de massas norte-americana?
     

    Carfer

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Portugal
    But in Algarve, they use 3rd person imperatives with children:

    M'nino, coma est' p'xinho. ;)
    Pois usam (e não só eles), mas 'Menino' é um tratamento semi-cerimonioso e mais ainda quando usado numa frase imperativa. A forma cerimoniosa é para marcar a distância, afastando a intimidade e salvaguardando a autoridade de quem o usa, mesmo que, paradoxalmente, este género de frases envolva muito afecto)

    Quando começamos a dizer "estou fazendo", "estava vindo"? Foi por influência da cultura de massas norte-americana?
    Não sei se estou a dizer asneira, mas julgo que fomos nós quem divergimos. Creio que, em séculos passados, o uso do gerúndio na forma progressiva era mais frequente do que é hoje.
     

    Myla

    Member
    Brazilian Portuguese
    Quando começamos a dizer "estou fazendo", "estava vindo"? Foi por influência da cultura de massas norte-americana?
    Acho que foi o "Vou estar fazendo" e esses gerundismos horríveis que entraram por causa do inglês... e não o gerúndio normal "estou fazendo". Tenho que pesquisar.
     

    Istriano

    Senior Member
    Croatian
    Quando começamos a dizer "estou fazendo", "estava vindo"? Foi por influência da cultura de massas norte-americana?
    Estou fazendo é a forma original, a forma mais antiga. :D
    É que em Portugal deixaram de usar, só isso, e optaram por uma nova forma.

    Em italiano, sto a far é como se diz em romanesco (dialeto de Roma).
    em vez de sto facendo (norma padrão). :D
     

    englishmania

    Senior Member
    Português Europeu
    É melhor não irmos por aí, senão as nossas palavras com consoantes mudas também seriam as certas porque são mais antigas... :D
     
    Last edited:

    machadinho

    Senior Member
    Português do Brasil
    Mas, por outro lado, se falássemos à lusa, não correríamos o risco de dizer "degrais", "troféis" e "Brasius".
     
    Last edited:

    machadinho

    Senior Member
    Português do Brasil
    Sorte sua, english! No Brasil, não diferenciamos palavras terminadas em "u" e "l". "Brasil" e "sumiu" terminam do mesmo modo. Daí que tem muita gente que erra os plurais.

    pastel->pastéis :tick:
    troféu->troféis :cross:
    troféu->troféus :tick:
     

    machadinho

    Senior Member
    Português do Brasil
    Mas não teríamos uma identidade.

    Alguém diz "Brasius"? Em que contexto?
    Uma fala como esta seria possível?
    "Nossa culura é muito variada. Não há um Brasil, há vários Brasius... opa, quero dizer, cof cof, vários Brasis ..."
    Mas o exemplo clássico é com "túnel" e "túneus". :cross:
     
    Last edited:

    Macunaíma

    Senior Member
    português, Brasil
    Uma fala como esta seria possível?
    "Nossa culura é muito variada. Não há um Brasil, há vários Brasius... opa, quero dizer, cof cof, vários Brasis ..."
    Mas o exemplo clássico é com "túnel" e "túneus". :cross:
    Artificialíssimo seu exemplo. Não é fácil se meter numa frase onde você precise usar o plural de Brasil. Alguém já ouviu Portugais?

    Já errar plural de palavra terminada em L acontece, por esse motivo que você mencionou. Eu mesmo já errei o plural de bordel neste fórum, e sou até mais alfabetizado que o Lula :D. Mas, de fato, esse tipo de confusão é bem menos comum do que o seu post leva a crer.
     

    anaczz

    Senior Member
    Português (Brasil)
    Um exemplo de erro comum entre as crianças que começam a escrever:

    baude ao invés de balde (meu filho cometeu esse erro uma vez e ainda ficou zangado comigo quando eu quis que corrigisse, pois, segundo ele, a lição era de ciências e não de português, portanto, não fazia diferença... :()

    Mas vi também em Portugal erros semelhantes, isto é, derivados da pronúncia.

    perfeito e prefeito tem pronúncias parecidas e tive a oportunidade de ver crianças em idade escolar (e mesmo um adulto) confundirem as grafias dessas e de outras palavras das quais não me lembro agora.
     

    Myla

    Member
    Brazilian Portuguese
    Verdade. Baseado nessa confusão de 'prefeito' , 'perfeito', penso que as crianças portuguesas devem se esquecer muito das vogais na hora de escrever...

    Pra elas, por exemplo, a pronúncia de diferente é igual a de frente; o que pra nós é completamente diferente.
     

    Myla

    Member
    Brazilian Portuguese
    Não é nem parecido???

    Já ouvi e achei um pouco parecido pra mim...porque como vcs não pronunciam algumas vogais, entendi que o "diferente" virava "difrente".
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top