When a ramen loses its soup

nagomi

Senior Member
Korean
How do you describe this? When you cook a ramen or an instant noodle, if you boil it too long you lose the soup. Yes, it's evaporating, but I think there must be a term that's used more frequently and is natural.
 
  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    We don't say "a ramen" or "an instant noodle" in English. We have to use a container, to make a countable noun:

    - a bowl of ramen noodles
    - a cup of instant noodles

    When I cook ramen noodles, the liquid is not "soup" yet. It is noodles in boiling water. So if you boil it too long, you "boil away the water". The packet that turns the remaining water into "soup" is put in afterwards, after you have stopped boiling.

    I have watched ramen being made by professional cooks in Japan. The noodles are put into a large pot full of boiling water, and cooked there. Then the noodles are drained. The "soup" is made in a separate pot, and combined with the noodles in each customer's serving bowl. Then any toppings are added (an egg, a slice of pork, etc.).

    If you were heating some other kind of soup (tomato soup) and all the water evaporated, we would say you "boiled away the water", leaving the other ingredients that made it "soup".
     

    nagomi

    Senior Member
    Korean
    We don't say "a ramen" or "an instant noodle" in English. We have to use a container, to make a countable noun:

    - a bowl of ramen noodles
    - a cup of instant noodles

    When I cook ramen noodles, the liquid is not "soup" yet. It is noodles in boiling water. So if you boil it too long, you "boil away the water". The packet that turns the remaining water into "soup" is put in afterwards, after you have stopped boiling.

    I have watched ramen being made by professional cooks in Japan. The noodles are put into a large pot full of boiling water, and cooked there. Then the noodles are drained. The "soup" is made in a separate pot, and combined with the noodles in each customer's serving bowl. Then any toppings are added (an egg, a slice of pork, etc.).

    If you were heating some other kind of soup (tomato soup) and all the water evaporated, we would say you "boiled away the water", leaving the other ingredients that made it "soup".
    Thank you. If there's any difference, we (in my language) would say from the 'soup's perspective because 'I' am the one who boils away the soup, but the incident is happening to the soup. Is there a way to say it that way, or do you just say "the soup was boiled away"?
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Thank you. If there's any difference, we (in my language) would say from the 'soup's perspective because 'I' am the one who boils away the soup, but the incident is happening to the soup. Is there a way to say it that way, or do you just say "the soup was boiled away"?
    Not really. If it was an accident I'd probably say I left it on the stove too long and all the liquid boiled away/evaporated.
     

    Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    How do you describe this? When you cook a ramen or an instant noodle, if you boil it too long you lose the soup. Yes, it's evaporating, but I think there must be a term that's used more frequently and is natural.
    You don't lose the soup - you lose the water part of the soup.

    If you lose the water when cooking something, you boil it dry.

    E.g.
    I was cooking noodles but forgot to check them and boiled them dry.
     
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