WHEN I BE in a village

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clevanna

New Member
Russian
Kindly ask you to let me know how should I say correctly the next sentence "when i be in a village". Whether I should say "when i'm going to be in a village" or "when i be in a village". I'm talking about the future here.

Thank you a lot!
 
Last edited:
  • Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    Welcome to the forum, clevanna!

    We need you to give us the complete sentence, to make sure we provide the right answer. Can you explain what it is you are trying to say?
     

    clevanna

    New Member
    Russian
    Dear Florentina52, thank you so much for your reply!

    The complete sentence is the next:

    "I wanted just to start preparing when I be in a village and will have lots of free time this summer"
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    If your question is about whether to use "when I be" or "when I'm going to be" in this sentence, only "when I'm going to be" has the possibility of being correct.

    Your sentence has other problems: you may need a preposition before "when." Your meaning isn't entirely clear.
     

    clevanna

    New Member
    Russian
    You are right. The question is how I should express my intention to prepare the task in the future if we don't use 'will' after 'when'.

    Here it's clear: I will do it, when I have free time
    orI will go outside when I finish my studies
    but when I use just be after when it sounds really weird to me (I mean that i can't say "when i will be in a village")

    I wanted to start preparing the task when I'm going to be in a village and have lots of free time this summer - does it sound better?
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    Let me see if I understand: There is a task you have to prepare - you have to get this task ready in some way (maybe so someone else can do it?) - and this preparation will happen during the summer, while you are in a village (you're not in a village now?) - is this right?
     

    clevanna

    New Member
    Russian
    1. Well, I'm the only one who is going to do this task
    2. You are right that this task will be done during the summer.
    3. I'm in the city now and i'm going to the the village during the summer to have a rest (I think it's a cultural thing - it's common to Russians to go to the village for the summer)
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    Okay, so you're not preparing the task during the summer, you're doing it, am I understanding now, or did I get it wrong again?

    I would say essentially what you rejected in post 6: "I want to do this task this summer, when I will be in a village and have lots of free time." I'm not sure why you don't want to do that.

    Edit: Wait, I think I figured it out. You can also say "this summer, when I am in a village . . . ." I think that's the alternate phrasing you're looking for.
     

    clevanna

    New Member
    Russian
    Thank you so much!
    1. You are right - I will do it (I think that I don't feel the difference between prepare and do. They sound to me as convertible terms)
    2. Edit: You got me right! That was my question. So, it's possible to say "when I am in a village and have lots of free time" in a future tense.
    I didn't even mention it, because I thought that it is incorrect. Thank you again.
     

    cando

    Senior Member
    English - British
    Thank you so much!
    1. You are right - I will do it (I think that I don't feel the difference between prepare and do. They sound to me as convertible terms)
    2. Edit: You got me right! That was my question. So, it's possible to say "when I am in a village and have lots of free time" in a future tense.
    I didn't even mention it, because I thought that it is incorrect. Thank you again.
    1. To "do" implies being actively engaged in some task; to "prepare" implies preliminary activity, simply getting ready (physically or even mentally) to do something.
    2. The use of "when" already puts the thought in a future frame of reference. English mostly uses the present tense rather than the future tense in this construction.


    As a final thought, saying when "I'm in a village" sounds a little odd to me. It's not grammatically wrong, but sounds like your saying you could be in any village anywhere in the world. I presume you mean your home village or somewhere you always go for the summer. In which case you would more likely say "when I'm in the village", which could be taken to refer to a cultural concept (spending summers in villages) as well as to a specific place for you.
     

    clevanna

    New Member
    Russian
    1. To "do" implies being actively engaged in some task; to "prepare" implies preliminary activity, simply getting ready (physically or even mentally) to do something.
    2. The use of "when" already puts the thought in a future frame of reference. English mostly uses the present tense rather than the future tense in this construction.


    As a final thought, saying when "I'm in a village" sounds a little odd to me. It's not grammatically wrong, but sounds like your saying you could be in any village anywhere in the world. I presume you mean your home village or somewhere you always go for the summer. In which case you would more likely say "when I'm in the village", which could be taken to refer to a cultural concept (spending summers in villages) as well as to a specific place for you.
    Thank you!
     
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