when I go/when I come

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Sandrin_Curandera

Member
Russian
Hello!

'Come' and 'go' are very confusing verbs for Russian speakers, and I came across such a problem.

1) I'm not at home, I'm only on my way home:
When I go/come home, I'll take a hot bath.

I suppose I should put 'come', because I can't take a bath if I'm not at home.

2) Another one. The boy often visits his grandparents' farm. He is at home now and says:
I would like to ride a horse when I go/come to the farm again.

This one is much more difficult. The boy isn't on the farm, so I should put "go".
But he only can ride a horse if he's on the farm. So, I should put 'come'.

Please, help!
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Hello.
    When I go/come home, I'll take a hot bath.
    I would use When I get (arrive) home, I'll take a hot bath.
    2) Another one. The boy often visits his grandparents' farm. He is at home now and says:
    I would like to ride a horse when I go/come to the farm again.
    Go makes more sense in this sentence. The boy is not at the farm, so go is more sensible than come in a comment about going to the farm.
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    1) When I get home, I'll take a hot bath.

    2) I would like to ride a horse when I go to the farm again.

    But if he is talking to his grandfather, or by phone to someone at the farm:

    I would like to ride a horse when I come to the farm again.

    EDIT: I meant to say "come" in this last context.
     
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    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - US
    This sounds okay to me. If you are speaking to someone at the farm, "come to the farm" is good.

    "Go to the farm" is also good. "Visit the farm" is also good, and avoids the "go/come" problem.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Come' and 'go' are very confusing verbs for Russian speakers
    As a learner still struggling with the intricacies of Russian verbs of motion, I had to smile at that. :)

    In BE, I don't think "visit the farm" sounds more natural. In general, we go somewhere other than the place we are in at the moment.

    Home has a slightly different usage.

    We go home when we leave the place we are at.
    When we are talking to someone who's already at (our) home (family members , for example), we say I'm coming home. If we call in sick to the office, we say to the people there: I'm not coming in today, and we tell the family at home: I'm not going to the office today.

    When you talk about going to the farm, or any other place where the person you're speaking to is based, you will probably use "come" - your listener is already there. If your listener is not at the farm at the moment, you'll most probably use go.

    I would like to ride a horse when I go to the farm again. You are not talking to someone who is at the farm right now.


    If I'm out with a family member, and I decide to return home, I may say: I'm going home now - are you coming (with me)?
    Come
    is used when we talk about someone accompanying us somewhere. I'm going to the shops; are you coming?
     
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