When I took in the tea.

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  • You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    We don’t have any context, Jardino. It could mean “When I brought in the tea.....”. Maybe it’s referring to the rattle of cups, saucers and teapot. What comes after that sentence?
     

    Jardino

    Senior Member
    Korean
    We don’t have any context, Jardino. It could mean “When I brought in the tea.....”. Maybe it’s referring to the rattle of cups, saucers and teapot. What comes after that sentence?
    Nothing comes after that...:( This is Graded Readers book of Great Gatsby.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    We don't know how they took in the tea. It might have been on a trolley with squeaky wheels. Much rattling of cups might have been involved.
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    Yes, she presumably took in tea for more than one person and that would have involved cups and things on a tray or a trolley, as the others have said. I can understand there could have been some noise.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    It appears to be tea for at least three people. I imagine than in 1920s America, as in 1920s England, this would mean a teapot, three cups and saucers, a sugar bowl with spoon or tongs, three teaspoons and quite likely a milk jug (do Americans put milk in tea?). Whatever way all this is carried, it could easily make a lot of noise.
     

    Jardino

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you for your all reply. Here's what I understood. I found the correct meaning of 'take'. here : Take - English Grammar Today - Cambridge Dictionary [ We can use take to mean ‘have’ when we talk about things we add to our food: ex) I take two sugars in my coffee but none in my tea. ]
    So, 'When I took in the tea' means 'When I had a sugar or something in the tea ' . As All of you said , When you had a sugar or something in the tea , there should be a lot of noise because you need to use iron spoon and stir. So definetely , It cause a noise of making the tea.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    There are at least 50 meanings of "take". But this one is collocated with "in" so it has to involve some movement. In this case one of examples 17 or 18 in the WR Dictionary:

    17. to carry with one.
    18. to carry from one place to another; convey or transport.
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    So, 'When I took in the tea' means 'When I had a sugar or something in the tea ' .
    No. "When I took in the tea" means "When I took the tray with the teacups, the teapot with tea, the milk jug, the sugar bowl and the cups and saucers in to the room". See posts 2, 4, 5 and 6 above.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I've had a look at your source, Jardino.

    Daisy and Gatsby were in the living room. The speaker had been to the kitchen to get the tea. "When I took in the tea" = When I took the tea into the living room.
     

    Jardino

    Senior Member
    Korean
    I've had a look at your source, Jardino.

    Daisy and Gatsby were in the living room. The speaker had been to the kitchen to get the tea. "When I took in the tea" = When I took the tea into the living room.
    Oh, my god. Thank you. very straightforward. In english , is usually object omitted?
     

    Jardino

    Senior Member
    Korean
    The object hasn't been omitted. It is "the tea". When I took the tea in (to them/the room).
    Hello Jack. I completely didn't know this was a phrasal verb. Because there's no list on the dictionaries. As you said, It would be more easy to understand If I found this a phrasal verb - when I took the tea in ( the room ). Very very thank you for your excellent teaching for me.
     

    Jardino

    Senior Member
    Korean
    It ins't a phrasal verb, just a verb with a preposition; "take" meaning "carry" can be used without "in".
    Hmm... When we see the phrasal verb in the dictionaries , They are represented as ' EX)make something ↔ up '. So , I thought this is the phrasal verb too, because I need to understand When I took in ↔ the tea. Here's my thought. Can I just understand ' in (the room) - adverb phrase ' is added between took and the tea ? So, Of course we can write ' Took the tea in (the room) ' .
     

    Jardino

    Senior Member
    Korean
    It ins't a phrasal verb, just a verb with a preposition; "take" meaning "carry" can be used without "in".
    "take" meaning "carry" can be used without "in". And I don't understand about this. The green is not be used without in. Was you telling me 'without in's object' ?
     
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    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    Compare it with the sentence: I carried the chair upstairs (to the bedroom). Does that seem fine to you?

    Similarly: I took the tea in (to the living room). I guess "in" is an adverb here.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    With a phrasal verb, the preposition has no meaning in itself, but modifies the meaning of the verb. With a phrasal verb, the preposition has far more restrictions placed on where it can go compared to an ordinary preposition with a non-phrasal verb. Consider the phrasal verb "take up" (meaning: start to practice or engage in):
    He took up baseball.:tick:
    He took baseball up.:cross:
    He took in the tea.:tick:
    He took the tea in.:tick:
    "take" meaning "carry" can be used without "in".
    "She took the dustbins out" and "he took the baby upstairs" both have the same meaning of "take" as "he took the tea in"; "in" isn't essential to the meaning of the verb.
     

    Jardino

    Senior Member
    Korean
    With a phrasal verb, the preposition has no meaning in itself, but modifies the meaning of the verb. With a phrasal verb, the preposition has far more restrictions placed on where it can go compared to an ordinary preposition with a non-phrasal verb. Consider the phrasal verb "take up" (meaning: start to practice or engage in):
    He took up baseball.:tick:
    He took baseball up.:cross:
    He took in the tea.:tick:
    He took the tea in.:tick:
    "She took the dustbins out" and "he took the baby upstairs" both have the same meaning of "take" as "he took the tea in"; "in" isn't essential to the meaning of the verb.
    Thank you! I've known them completely the other way. [With phrasal verbs the object can come before or after the particle if the object is not a pronoun. With prepositional verbs, the object is always immediately after the preposition. ]
     
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    Jardino

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Compare it with the sentence: I carried the chair upstairs (to the bedroom). Does that seem fine to you?

    Similarly: I took the tea in (to the living room). I guess "in" is an adverb here.
    Yeah, so did I too. If In is used as adverb , should be much more straightforward to me. Very complicated!!! :eek:
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Thank you! I've known completely the other way. [With phrasal verbs the object can come before or after the particle if the object is not a pronoun. With prepositional verbs, the object is always immediately after the preposition. ]
    Yes, that's how I understand it too.

    Whether take in in the sentence "I took in the tea" is a phrasal verb or not depends on how you define the term phrasal verb.

    But
    (1) "in", for me, is definitely an adverb there
    (2) the verb + adverb combination behaves, syntactically, very much like a phrasal verb:
    I took in the tea.:tick:
    I took the tea in.:tick:
    I took in it.:cross:
    I took it in.:tick:
     

    Jardino

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Yes, that's how I understand it too.

    Whether take in in the sentence "I took in the tea" is a phrasal verb or not depends on how you define the term phrasal verb.

    But
    (1) "in", for me, is definitely an adverb there
    (2) the verb + adverb combination behaves, syntactically, very much like a phrasal verb:
    I took in the tea.:tick:
    I took the tea in.:tick:
    I took in it.:cross:
    I took it in.:tick:
    Then , Now I'm done with this? First : Here 'in' is used as adverb. Second : the way that I understood a phrasal and preposition verb is correct. Thank you. I'm very tired of it now. Phew :(... By the way , "the verb + adverb combination behaves, syntactically, very much like a phrasal verb:" This is very useful for me. Gorgeous information.
     
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