when I'm done

VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
Roger Rabbit is singing a song (where he mentions the detective Eddie Valiant) in a pub:
My buddy's Eddie V.
A sourpuss you'll see
But when I'm done
He'll need no gun
Cause a joker he will be.

'Who Framed Roger Rabbit', movie

Explain, please, what the part in bold means.
Thanks.
 
  • dharasty

    Senior Member
    American English
    I don't remember the scene... but it sounds like Roger is planning/plotting to do something to Eddie.

    So Roger is saying "When I have completed my plans, Eddie will no longer need a gun."
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    I don't remember the scene... but it sounds like Roger is planning/plotting to do something to Eddie.

    So Roger is saying "When I have completed my plans, Eddie will no longer need a gun."
    But that's just your guess or "I'm done" grammatically can mean "I'm planning to do something to someone"?
     

    Warsaw Will

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    "I'm done" is usually an informal way of saying "I'm finished" - for example:
    "Are you done with the photocopier?" = "Have you finished with the photocopier?"
    "If we're all done for the day, I suggest we go to the pub." = "If we're all finished ..."

    So as dharasty says, it sounds as though RR is saying that when he's finished (whatever he is planning), Eddie V will need no gun. To answer VikNikSor, "done" refers to the act of finishing (or completing), not the plans themselves, which are simply taken as understood from the context.

    Here's another example - "He may be laughing at me now, but when I'm done he'll be laughing on the other side of his face" = when I've finished with him he won't be so happy
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    "I'm done" is usually an informal way of saying "I'm finished" - for example:
    "Are you done with the photocopier?" = "Have you finished with the photocopier?"
    "If we're all done for the day, I suggest we go to the pub." = "If we're all finished ..."

    So as dharasty says, it sounds as though RR is saying that when he's finished (whatever he is planning), Eddie V will need no gun. To answer VikNikSor, "done" refers to the act of finishing (or completing), not the plans themselves, which are simply taken as understood from the context.

    Here's another example - "He may be laughing at me now, but when I'm done he'll be laughing on the other side of his face" = when I've finished with him he won't be so happy
    But one thing:
    Roger says: "when I'm done He'll need no gun ..."
    or
    "He may be laughing at me now, but when I'm done he'll be laughing on ...
    I mean "They don't say "when I'm done with something/with someone/doing something", but just "when I'm done".
    With what exactly are they done? Or it's usually understood from what was said before?
     

    dharasty

    Senior Member
    American English
    Or it's usually understood from what was said before?
    In this case, yes, you have to understand it from what was said before.

    If I say: "When I'm finished, I'm going to take a nap", the activity I'm doing now is unsaid.

    This is identical to: "When I'm done, I'm going to take a nap."
     
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