When not oiled, can a door groan on its hinges?

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Zealous

Senior Member
Russian
Once, after the class has already started, a student entered the classroom and the door groaned on its hinges. Professor said

- Don't come over here any more without lubricant!

The red phrase above is the point of my question: can it be used in this form?

Many Thanks to You
 
  • Franzi

    Senior Member
    (San Francisco) English
    Normally, I would use 'squeak' to describe hinge noises. 'Groan' would be ok in a novel or poetry.

    (I don't think I'd usually use 'lubricant' in this situation. Did someone actually say this?)
     

    Arrius

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    without an oil can is probably what a sarcastic teacher would say. It would in any case be a lubricant.
    lubricant is general, including medical. and especially for motor cars.
     

    Franzi

    Senior Member
    (San Francisco) English
    without an oil can is probably what a sarcastic teacher would say. It would in any case be a lubricant.
    lubricant is general, including medical. and especially for motor cars.
    Yes, I agree that the word 'lubricant' can refer to lots of things. However, if a professor made the exact comment the original poster quoted, I would expect a sexual harrassment suit to follow. This could be an AE/BE difference.
     

    Arrius

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    As a former teacher myself whose experience includes, alas, many years in British mainstream secondary education, I too immediately saw the probable reaction of a class to this highly ill-advised remark, which would result in ribaldry, at the very least. And such behaviour often requires really no pretext whatsoever. I think professor may be taken here to mean teacher, presumably as it does in Russian and as in several other European languages.
     

    Zealous

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Right, I did overstate his academic status - he was a teacher performing the duties of professor, without being a professor himself at that time. The teacher, however, demonstrated his sexual orientation in a very explicit way; the impertinent reamark like that was a common "joke" at his classes, which could made the guys feel abashed..
     

    brian

    Senior Member
    AmE (New Orleans)
    If the teacher has a history of showing his sexual orientation or general sexuality to the class in an explicit/overt way, then the two words groan and lubricant were most likely used on purpose to call to mind sexual images:
    - groan, not the normal word for the sound that a door makes (which would be squeak), but rather the word for the sound a person makes during sex, e.g. a woman could "groan" with pleasure.

    - lubricant, definitely used non-sexually in certain contexts, e.g. mechanics, but very often calls to mind sexual lubricants, i.e. oils and things used during sex.
    So yeah, given this teacher's sexual history, I'd say the writer chose these unusual words on purpose.
     
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