When the cat's away, the mice will play.

Encolpius

Senior Member
Hungarian
Hello, do you also use that proverb in your langauges? Thanks.

Hungarian: Nincs otthon a macska, cincognak az egerek. [isn't at home the cat, squeak the mice]
 
  • enoo

    Senior Member
    French - France
    French: Quand le chat n'est pas là, les souris dansent. (word for word: When the cat isn't there, the mice dance)
     

    Hakro

    Senior Member
    Finnish - Finland
    Finnish:

    Kun kissa on poissa, hiiret tanssivat pöydällä (When the cat is away, the mice are dancing on the table)
    or
    Kun kissa on poissa, hiiret hyppivät pöydällä (When the cat is away, the mice are jumping on the table)

    I think that the first version is the classic one, but the second version seems to be more common today.
     

    Natalisha

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Russian: Без кота мышам раздолье. [bez kata mysham razdolje] - Without a cat there is freedom/spaciousness for mice.
     

    apmoy70

    Senior Member
    Greek
    In Greek:
    «Όταν λείπει η γάτα χορεύουν τα ποντίκια»
    'otan 'lipi i 'ɣata xo'revun ta pon'dicia*
    lit. "when the cat's absent the mice dance"
    Like in French & Italian, our mice dance when the cat isn't here

    *The word for mouce is «μῦς» (mūs, m.) in ancient Greek, «μυς» (mis, m. in modern Greek); there was a kind of rodent native to the Pontus area of Minor Asia (the shores of the Black Sea) named in ancient times «ποντικός μῦς» (i.e. the Pontic mouce). In the Hellenistic times the adj. «ποντικός» slowly began to prevail and since the Byzantine times the word for mouce colloquially is «ποντικός» (pondi'kos, m.-->the pontic) or its diminutive «ποντίκιον» (pon'dicion, n.)-->«ποντίκι» (pon'dici, n.-->the little pontic)

    [x] is a voiceless velar fricative, known as the hard ch
    [c] is a voiceless palatal plosive
     

    phosphore

    Senior Member
    Serbian
    Well, kolo is a kind of traditional dance, and voditi means to conduct, so it does mean to dance, but that construction is used only in this expression. Otherwise we say igrati=to play, to dance or more rarely plesati=to dance.
     

    Rallino

    Moderatoúrkos
    Turkish
    In Turkish:

    "Kedi olmayınca fareler cirit atar" = literally "when the cat doesn't exist, the mice throw javelins"
     
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    Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    In Turkish:

    "Kedi olmayınca fareler cirit atar" = literally "when the cat doesn't exist, the mice throw javelins"
    First, keep using that colourful marking system, because it is very useful and I hope it hasn't been copyrighted yet because I'd like to use it, too. :)

    Does that saying exist in Turkish? It seems it does, because you use quite an interesting collocation: cirit atar, what do you mean by that collocation exactly, is it used in other cases as well? thanks.
     

    Rallino

    Moderatoúrkos
    Turkish
    First, keep using that colourful marking system, because it is very useful and I hope it hasn't been copyrighted yet because I'd like to use it, too. :)
    Yes it's really useful, and fun :D

    Does that saying exist in Turkish? It seems it does, because you use quite an interesting collocation: cirit atar, what do you mean by that collocation exactly, is it used in other cases as well? thanks.
    Cirit atma, is the name of an olympic game, I don't know the exact English Term but, the athletes throw javelins or staves, the farther the better.

    BUT,

    Cirit atmak (infinitive), is an expression in Turkish. It means, some things or some people are abundant in a place and aren't doing anything useful. ;)


    P.S. Could it be because Turks think that this sport is useless? :D
     

    Orlin

    Banned
    български
    Bulgarian: Когато котката я няма, мишките танцуват. = When the cat is absent, (lit .the) mice dance.
    Bulgarians who know French have told me that 1:1 matching French expression exists (so the Bulgarian expression is probably a literal translation from French but because I don't speak French can't confirm this).
     
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    bibax

    Senior Member
    Czech (Prague)
    Czech:

    Když kocour není doma, myši mají pré.

    When the tomcat is not home, the mice have a "pré".

    pré (= coll. latitude/abandonment) is from French "avoir préference"
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    Dutch (addition) : that might be the origin (had not thought of that), but I have only heard the short version, i.e., without the table. But the table-version might well be the original.

    (I do think I'll go for a Dutch translation of the Turkish version from now on: so colourful ! ;-))
     

    Candle9000

    Senior Member
    Mexican Spanish
    I've heard it in two ways: Cuando el gato está ausente, los ratones bailan or se divierten.
    "When the cat's away, mice dance/have fun".

    gato = cat
    ratones = mice
    bailar = to dance
    divertirse = to have fun

    But it's not one of the most popular proverbs.
     

    jana.bo99

    Senior Member
    Cro, Slo
    Croatian:

    Kad nema mačke, miševi plesu

    Slovenian:

    Ko mačke ni doma miši plešejo

    (When the cat is not at the home, mouses play)
     

    jana.bo99

    Senior Member
    Cro, Slo
    Hi Orlin,

    Thank you for correction of my translation.

    If I am always in English Forums in that case I forget Croatian: š!


    jana.bo
     

    bollovan

    New Member
    Romanian
    In Romanian:


    Cand pisica nu-i acasa, soarecii joaca pe masa.

    When the cat isn't at home, the mice dance on the table.
     

    swift

    Senior Member
    Spanish – Costa Rica (Valle Central)
    Hi,

    Costa Rica, Spanish: Cuando el gato se va, los ratones hacen fiesta (when the cat's away, the mice make a party)

    And welcome to the forums, Bollovan. :)

    Feliz domingo.
     
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    Explorer41

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian: Когато котката я няма, мишките танцуват. = When the cat is absent, (lit .the) mice dance.
    Bulgarians who know French have told me that 1:1 matching French expression exists (so the Bulgarian expression is probably a literal translation from French but because I don't speak French can't confirm this).
    Russian: Кот из домумыши в пляс.

    Literally: when the cat goes out of the home, mice start to make dancing. In the Russian sentence the verbs are omitted, but implied, as it is usual for figurative emotional speech and proverbs like this. "when" is also implied by the intonation; in writing, the dash serves to reflect its meaning.
     
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    AutumnOwl

    Senior Member
    -
    Swedish
    Swedish: När katten är borta dansar råttorna på bordet - when the cat is away the rats dance on the table, no small mice here.
     
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