When the rubble had stopped bouncing

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pgadamer

New Member
Portuguese - Portugal & Brazil
Hello everyone,

could you please help me understand this phrase?
I know it has a conection with Churhill quotes, but I just can't understand the meaning. I have to translate that.

The author is talking about social theorists, but "them" on the sentence refers to derivative markets.

"Then, when the rubble had stopped bouncing, it turned out that many if not most of them had been nothing more than very elaborate scams."

Thank you,
Paulo Gadamer
 
Last edited:
  • EStjarn

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Let's start with the Churchill quote. This is from NationalChurchillMuseum.org, under the heading The Cold War Defined: Churchill's Perspective:
    The United States sought to win the Cold War; Churchill sought to overcome it. Of the United States policy Churchill remarked, "If you go on with this nuclear arms race, all you are going to do is make the rubble bounce."
    I would suggest that the meaning of rubble in that quotation is (from Webster's College Dictionary): 1. broken bits and pieces of anything, as that which is demolished: Bombing reduced the town to rubble.

    To make the rubble bounce
    means to destroy further what has already been destroyed (cf. the thread rubble bounce).

    In context, I would understand When the rubble had stopped bouncing to mean 'after all the damage had been done'.
     

    pgadamer

    New Member
    Portuguese - Portugal & Brazil
    In context, I would understand When the rubble had stopped bouncing to mean 'after all the damage had been done'.
    Hello, EStjarn,

    Thank you so much for your answer, now it's clear. I'll have to specify the meaning. Do you think, in context, that "after all the damage had been done" is similar to "to make matters even worse"? I'm saying that because the writter adds an information, saying that derivatives market are frauds.

    Thank you
    Paulo.
     

    EStjarn

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Hello pgadamer,

    This time, let's extract some more text from your source to get a better grasp of the context. We are allowed to quote up to four sentences, as you can verify in the forum rules found at the top of the forum home page.

    It's from Debt: The First 5,000 Years by David Graeber. It seems the topic sentence builds on the following, from pp. 14-15 in this Amazon.com preview of the book (also at ISSUU.com):
    There are obvious reasons why this is a particularly important moment to reexamine the history of debt. September 2008 saw the beginning of a financial crisis that almost brought the entire world economy sreeching to a halt. In many ways, the world economy did...
    I would not paraphrase when the rubble had stopped bouncing as to make matters even worse, but rather as after the crisis had hit rock bottom, or when the crisis stopped getting any worse.

    To paraphrase the topic sentence: Then, after the crisis had hit rock bottom, it became apparent that many, if not most, of them had been nothing more than very elaborate scams.

    Welcome to WordReference. :)
     

    pgadamer

    New Member
    Portuguese - Portugal & Brazil
    Yeah, you are completely right: it's from Debt.

    Actually I did not quote up nothing because I didn't know it is allowed. Thanks for the note.

    "when the crisis stopped getting any worse" seems the perfect solution to me.

    Thank you so much,
    P.
     
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