when there is a possibility of doing something there is the same amount of impossibility of doing it as well

farima_mt

Senior Member
persian
Hi,
Is that right to say "when there is a possibility of doing something there is the same amount of impossibility of doing it as well",does it make sense?
cheers
farima
 
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  • Marcos-PS

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    Hi,
    Is that right to say "when there is a possibility of doing something there is the same amount of impossibility of doing it as well",does it make sense?
    cheers
    farima
    To my perception, it is fine, just adding a missing comma between the clauses, and removing the article "a":

    "when there is a possibility of doing something, there is the same amount of impossibility of doing it as well"

    Why have I removed it?

    If you add "a" you are making possibility countable. On the other hand, impossibility is later referred to as uncountable, proven to be so by the word "amount". Both clauses have to have the same structure.

    Therefore, I'd write it like this:

    "when there is possibility of doing something, there is the same amount of impossibility of doing it as well"

    That's my view as a non-native. Let's wait for my replies to verify the outcomes.

    Regards :)
     

    shawnee

    Senior Member
    English - Australian
    I'm not satisfied with an amount of impossibility so I would suggest: The possibility of doing something is equally matched with the same degree of not doing something.
     

    Uncle Bob

    Senior Member
    British English
    I agree with Shawnee about "amount of impossibility" but suggest:
    "When there is the possibility of doing something, then it is equally impossible to do it well."
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Uncle Bob, that has a different meaning, doesn't it? The original statement was contrasting the possibility and impossibility of doing a particular thing, not the quality of the accomplishment when it is done. Did you mean "...then it is equally impossible to do it as well"?

    I'm also not sure if we're commenting on the way the thought is expressed or the thought itself. I certainly don't think that there is an equal likelihood of something being accomplished or not accomplished in all cases.

    Commenting only on the expression of the thought, I'd suggest:

    When there is a possibility of doing something, there is an equal possibility of not doing it.
     

    djmc

    Senior Member
    English - United Kingdom
    I came across this yesterday and seeing that no-one else has commented, I thought I would add a bit more.

    It seems to me that there is some confusion here both of language and of logic. The original question was "when there is a possibility of doing something there is the same amount of impossibility of doing it as well". This sounds unnatural but it may be what was intended was the following. If there is a possibility of something being the case then there is also a possibility that is not the case. That is it is not necessary or impossible. Thus if P is a proposition, if P is possible then it is also possible that not P.

    Let us substitute a real example. If I bought a lottery ticket then it would be possible that I might win the lottery; similarly (or one might say equally) it would also be possible that I would not win the lottery.

    The two possibilities are not however equal, I might have a one in a million chance that I would win. Because something is possible does not mean that it is probable. If I toss an unweighted coin there is an equal chance that it may come down heads or tails, if I throw a die there is a one in six chance that it may come down a six. One can use statistics to calculate the probability.
     

    farima_mt

    Senior Member
    persian
    Djmc,
    T hanks for your explanations,it's certainly my poorness in english which has confused every one,well what i intended was " when there is more possibility to do some thing there is also more impossibility of doing it",i meant if it increases the possibility of doing something at the same time increases impossibility of doing it,i appreciate if you help me to say it correctly.thank you again for your help.
    farima
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    ... what i intended was " when there is more possibility to do some thing there is also more impossibility of doing it",

    i meant if it increases the possibility of doing something at the same time increases impossibility of doing it,
    ...
    As djmc explained, these sentences are logically flawed.
    They say that if something becomes more possible it also becomes more impossible.
     

    shawnee

    Senior Member
    English - Australian
    I took the proposal to be another way of describing the 'glass half full - also half empty' paradigm; or at least an attempt at it.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I took the proposal to be another way of describing the 'glass half full - also half empty' paradigm; or at least an attempt at it.
    Taking farima_mt's explanations into account, though, and applying them to this analogy, the resulting statement would be that the more full the glass becomes, the more empty it also becomes in equal proportion.

    It is an illogical premise.
     

    djmc

    Senior Member
    English - United Kingdom
    I still think you have the wrong idea. If something becomes more possible or probable it becomes less improbable. If I have a 50% chance of doing something then the chance that I cannot do it is 50%. If I improve my chances so that I have a 75% chance of doing it then the possibility that I cannot do it will be less, in fact 25%. The percentage probability of something happening and of it not happening will always be 100%, thus if I am guaranteed that I can do something, the percentage chance that I can do it will be 100, that I will fail will be zero. The chance of something being possible is inversely related to its opposite.
     
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