When to abbreviate "I have" to "I've"

ADX

New Member
tamil
Wondering if anyone knows when to abbreviate the word "have". For example I want to say I have a new pair of shoes, can I abbreviate it I've new pair of shoes.

Anyone knows when to use I've....
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Welcome to the forum, ADX. That sounds British to me. We don't use that contraction much in the U.S. I'll bet one of our British members could answer this one for you:) Please wait for more answers.
     

    mplsray

    Senior Member
    Wondering if anyone knows when to abbreviate the word "have". For example I want to say I have a new pair of shoes, can I abbreviate it I've new pair of shoes.

    Anyone knows when to use I've....
    To add to what owlman5 has said, in American English we don't generally abbreviate have when it is a transitive verb.

    :cross:I don't think we've the time for that.
    :tick:I don't think we have the time for that.

    The one exception I can think of is when have is used in the sense of "to feel an obligation to," "to be under an obligation to," where it is usually associated with a following to.

    :tick:We have no need to follow his advice.
    :tick:We've no need to follow his advice.

    Addition: Come to think of it, with that obligation sense of the verb have, the abbreviation we've would be used only in negative contexts in American contexts.

    :tick:We have a need for clarification.
    :cross:We've a need for clarification.

    (Although "We've a need for speed" does appear, and seems to be a fixed form.)
     
    Last edited:

    sunyaer

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    ...

    Addition: Come to think of it, with that obligation sense of the verb have, the abbreviation we've would be used only in negative contexts in American contexts.

    :tick:We have a need for clarification.
    :cross:We've a need for clarification.
    Which sentence is the example for "the abbreviation we've would be used only in negative contexts in American contexts"?
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    Which sentence is the example for "the abbreviation we've would be used only in negative contexts in American contexts"?
    If I understand your question correctly, it's this one:

    :tick:We've no need to follow his advice.

    I have to say, though, that the sentence sounds like BE to me. I rarely use "we've" except when forming the present perfect: "We've been to New Zealand four times, but we've never been to Japan."
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Yes, as owlman said, we do that in BE routinely: "I've a new pair of shoes", "We've 5 grandchildren" (As common as "We've got 5 grandchildren"). Also "We've a need for clarification" is perfectly acceptable in BE.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I think "I've" and "we've" and most other contractions are fine in conversation and OK as dialog. I avoid most contractions when writing however, (except in very informal writing).
     

    sunyaer

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Which sentence is the example for "the abbreviation we've would be used only in negative contexts in American contexts"?
    If I understand your question correctly, it's this one:

    :tick:We've no need to follow his advice.
    Does this sentence sound right in BE context?

    What does "the abbreviation we've would be used only in negative contexts in American contexts" mean? Does it mean that we've would not be used in non-negative contexts and that we've would not be used in negative contexts in contexts other than American ones?

    ...
    :cross:We've a need for clarification.
    ...
    Also "We've a need for clarification" is perfectly acceptable in BE.
    Is it wrong in American English?
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top