When traveling to Paris, don't go there

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Horrid Henry

Member
polski
Hello,
I was utterly baffled by the following line:

"When traveling to Paris, don't go there. Really, it won't serve your cause."

It comes from Olivier Magny's satyrical book Stuff Parisians Like. It appears at the end of a chapter in which the author mocks Parisians for judging people by the color of their socks. Any idea what the line means? "There" cannot possibly refer to any place within paris as no particular places are desribed in that chapter.

All best,
HH

PS
The author, Magny, is French, and wrote his book in "broken English", as he himself admits in the Introduction...
 
  • Horrid Henry

    Member
    polski
    Magny writes that even if you are a Nobel prize winner, Parisians will still judge you by the colour of your socks--that, I think, explains what he means by "cause" (science, enlightenment etc.).

    PS
    And the whole chapter can probably be found on Magny's blog.
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    Can you give us the previous sentences (up to three) for some context? I can think of at least two possible interpretations of this, one using the literal meaning of "don't go there," and one using an idiomatic meaning.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)

    Horrid Henry

    Member
    polski
    Thanks a lot. I just didn't expect "don't go there" to be an idiom, even though I know the phrase "I've been there".
     
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