When will you make an account for me

Lian77

Banned
Nor
Hello,

I was wondering how one would say this in German: When will you make me an account?

Would it be: Wann wirst du ein Konto mir machen?

or...

Wann wirst du ein Konto fuer mich machen?

Or would they both work?

Thanks a bunch :)
 
  • jebbe

    Senior Member
    German, Germany
    Hello,

    I was wondering how one would say this in German: When will you make me an account?

    Would it be: Wann wirst du mir ein Konto mir machen?

    or...

    Wann wirst du ein Konto fuer mich machen? :tick:

    Or would they both work?

    Thanks a bunch :)
    That way, both would work, but they don't really sound idiomatic. First of all - what kind of account is it going to be? "Konto" usually refers to a bank account, and in that case you might say "Wann wirst du mir ein Konto eröffnen?", meaning "When will you settle an account for me?" Context might help here...

    jebbe
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    That way, both would work, but they don't really sound idiomatic. First of all - what kind of account is it going to be? "Konto" usually refers to a bank account, and in that case you might say "Wann wirst du mir ein Konto eröffnen?", meaning "When will you settle an account for me?" Context might help here...

    jebbe
    I have a similar problem. I don't understand what the English sentence means. Could you give us context?

    By the way, both of these are common in English:

    Please give me the pen.
    Please give the pen to me.

    In German, the dative pronoun almost always preceeds the noun. There may be exceptions, but I don't think they are very common. :)

    Gaer
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    "Wann wirst du mir ein Konto eröffnen?"

    Usually, you say this in a bank and have to use the polite form (Höflichkeitsform).

    Wann werden Sie mein Konto eröffnen?
    Wann werden Sie mein Konto einrichten?
    Wann werden Sie mir ein Konto eröffnen?
    Wann werden Sie mir ein Konto einrichten?
    ---

    If it is for computers, use the word "Nutzerkonto" or "Benutzerkonto". May be you can use the word "Account" here, because it comes into the German language quickly, but I think, it is not standard yet.

    Wann werden Sie mir ein Nutzerkonto einrichten? (generally)

    Wann wirst du mein Nutzerkonto einrichten? (to a friend or relative)

    (In this meaning, you can also say "Account" or "Benutzerkonto" instead of "Konto".)
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    In German, the dative pronoun almost always preceeds the noun. There may be exceptions, but I don't think they are very common.
    They are seldom.

    Example:

    Den Stift mir zu geben ist wichtig. (The focus is on: you will give me the pen and not another person. There must be an accent (emphasis, Betonung - what is the appropriate word?) on "mir".
    Mir den Stift zu geben ist wichtig. (The focus is on: you will give me the pen and not a scissor, or on the whole first part: Mir den Stift zu geben.)
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    They are seldom.

    Example:

    Den Stift mir zu geben ist wichtig. (The focus is on: you will give me the pen. There must be an accent (emphasis, Betonung - what is the appropriate word?) on "mir".
    Mir den Stift zu geben ist wichtig. (The focus is on: you will give me the pen and not a scissor, or on the whole first part: Mir den Stift zu geben.)
    Subtle! You can see why I am always careful about "seldom" vs. "never". :)

    I agree with your translations for this:

    "When will you make me an account?"

    But it must be "open", the same in English as in German:

    "When will you open an account for me?"

    This is a bit different:

    Wann werden Sie mein Konto eröffnen?
    When will you open my account?

    In most situations all your suggestions may be the same, but there could also be differences. This is why I asked for context.

    Gaer
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    "eröffnen" is something like "open the account for the first time, open a new account"

    "öffnen" may also be to open it again, after it was closed. But in this case, it must have a reference to the past closing. If there is no reference, it has the same meaning, as eröffnen.
     

    Kajjo

    Senior Member
    I was wondering how one would say this in German: When will you make me an account?
    It is obvious that we need more context!
    What kind of account are we talking about?
    A bank account or maybe a computer user account?

    Please always try to provide as much context as possible. This makes it much easier for us to give good advice and spares us troubles guessing what you might want to know.

    Kajjo
     

    Lian77

    Banned
    Nor
    Thanks for all the replies, sorry about the lack of context. The account is referring to an internet website account. However, I was more concerned about the grammar of the sentence. Such as, "mir" compared to "fuer mich" :)
     

    Kajjo

    Senior Member
    Lian, thanks for providing the proper context. Please note how important this is! The typical question in German is:

    Wann kannst Du mir einen Account einrichten? [personal]
    Wann können Sie mir einen Account einrichten? [polite]

    Kajjo
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    I want to repeat that it should be:

    "When will you create/open an account for me?"

    "Make an account", to my ears, sounds very strange, although it appears a surprising number of times in a Google search:

    Results 1 - 10 of about 1,160,000 for "make an account".
    Results 1 - 10 of about 4,280,000 for "open an account".
    Results 1 - 10 of about 35,400,000 for "create an account".

    I would definitely recomnend "creat" in this phrase. :)

    Gaer
     

    Lian77

    Banned
    Nor
    Hmm... I never thought of searching Google for results of context, very good idea. Where I grew up it was very common to say "make an account" instead of "create/open an account". Perhaps this is just a regional colloquial sort of thing, who knows. :p
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Hmm... I never thought of searching Google for results of context, very good idea. Where I grew up it was very common to say "make an account" instead of "create/open an account". Perhaps this is just a regional colloquial sort of thing, who knows. :p
    When I find more than a million hits, I am very conservative about saying that something is wrong.

    I was just 100% wrong about "take a decision", which looked wrong to me. It turns out that this is completely fine in BE.

    If you ever have a question about whether or not something is used regionally, just ask about it in the English forum. :)
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top