Whenever I drop by, the hostess of the restaurant was smiling.

sejpdw

Senior Member
Korean
"Whenever I drop by, the hostess of the restaurant was smiling."
As I know, it is more common to use "Whenever I drop by, the hostess of the restaurant is smiling." or "Whenever I dropped by, the hostess of the restaurant was smiling." What's the reason for using the present tense "drop" and the past tense "was" at the same time?
 
  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    It's hard to know. Where did you find this? (Name the source please.) What was the sentence before it and the sentence after?

    My first thought is that it's a mistake, but it is always possible that more context would somehow show that I was wrong.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I'm with Cagey, only perhaps more so. I think you have a choice between these two:

    "Whenever I drop by, the hostess of the restaurant is smiling."

    "Whenever I dropped by, the hostess of the restaurant was smiling."

    I don't see how a different context could allow a mixture, as you suggest, Sejpdw.
     
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