Where do you reside?

epistolario

Senior Member
Tagalog
Usually, on the first day in school, some teachers ask their students "where do you reside?" And the students usually do not know what to answer. So the teacher changes reside to live.

It seems that the word reside sounds formal in that scenario. Is that question generally understood by native English speakers? What do you think of the usage of that word?
 
  • xqby

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    In everyday speech it would sound pretentious to me; I would use it in writing as an alternative to "live" but it's not normally part of my spoken vocabulary.

    I think most moderately educated people here would be familiar with the verb, though perhaps more so its noun form of "residence."
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    It would certainly be understood, but it would not be a natural question. The normal way of asking this is "where do you live?" To ask "where do you reside" does sound a little affected.
     

    George French

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    It's probably part of the trend to use fancy/different words instead of good old Anglo-Saxon words.

    One sounds more refined using reside than live.....

    (What are the roots of live and reside by the way?)

    GF.
     

    TriglavNationalPark

    Senior Member
    Slovenian (a.k.a. Slovene)
    It's probably part of the trend to use fancy/different words instead of good old Anglo-Saxon words.

    One sounds more refined using reside than live.....
    Right. Because of the Norman conquest of England and the social stratification that developed at that time, many words originally introduced by the Normans, including "reside", are considered more formal and/or refined than their "common" Anglo-Saxon equivalents.

    In this case, "reside" is too pretentious for everyday speech, but it's perfectly appropriate for formal writing (depending on the context, of course).
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Usually, on the first day in school, some teachers ask their students "where do you reside?" And the students usually do not know what to answer. So the teacher changes reside to live.

    It seems that the word reside sounds formal in that scenario. Is that question generally understood by native English speakers? What do you think of the usage of that word?
    I would understand the question, of course.

    But it would sound quite strange to me - not just formal, but unidiomatic:(
     
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    Nymeria

    Senior Member
    English - Barbadian/British/educated in US universities blend
    Usually, on the first day in school, some teachers ask their students "where do you reside?" And the students usually do not know what to answer. So the teacher changes reside to live.

    It seems that the word reside sounds formal in that scenario. Is that question generally understood by native English speakers? What do you think of the usage of that word?
    Reside should be easily understood by that vast majority of English speakers. It is slightly more formal than "live", but I see nothing wrong with using it at all. If the word works epistolario, use it. To me, that's the point of having synonyms. If not, we could remove all positive adjectives from the dictionary and replace them with the word "nice" *yawn* :)
     
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    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I agree with Loob.
    Using reside in this context is not formal, it is unidiomatic and unnatural.
    Formally, on a form, I might be asked for my place of residence, but the question "Where do you reside" invites ridicule - and in the context of a first day in school it simply would not be used.
     

    lablady

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    epistolario doesn't give us the age of the students. I can see where a six-year-old might not understand the word "reside", but "Where do you reside?" should easily be understood by an older student.

    That said, I think it is most often expressed as "Where do you live?"
     
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    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Reside should be easily understood by that vast majority of English speakers. It is slightly more formal than "live", but I see nothing wrong with using it at all. If the word works epistolario, use it. To me, that's the point of having synonyms. If not, we could remove all positive adjectives from the dictionary and replace them with the word "nice" *yawn* :)
    I took epistolario's question as meaning "is this Filipino usage standard across other varieties of English?"
    To which the answer is, I think, "no"...
     
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    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I took epistolario's question as meaning "is this Filipino usage standard across other varieties of English?"
    To which the answer is, I think, "no"...
    Yes, I think Loob is spot on. One of the features of the English in the ex-colonies is an occasional preference for formal vocabulary.
     
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    Questra

    New Member
    English
    For me, as an English speaker from the U.S., the principal difference between 'reside' and 'live' is mirrored by the general cultural trend of "...why use one syllable when six will do?..."; that is, there is a general tendency to become really verbose and wordy by using more syllables than necessary to convey very simple thoughts, ideas, etc.
     

    wolfbm1

    Senior Member
    Polish
    What about these questions:
    1. Where are you currently residing?
    2. Where are you currently living?

    Are they interchangeable?
    Can they mean: "Where are you from"?
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    1) is unidiomatic and unnatural.
    2) is possible.
    Neither one means "Where are you from?"
    There has to be a reason for the inclusion of "currently": "Where do you live?" and "Where are you from?" are meaningful without it. You could say "Where are you currently living?" if you knew that the other person was constantly moving house.
     

    wolfbm1

    Senior Member
    Polish
    1) is unidiomatic and unnatural.
    2) is possible.
    Neither one means "Where are you from?"
    There has to be a reason for the inclusion of "currently": "Where do you live?" and "Where are you from?" are meaningful without it. You could say "Where are you currently living?" if you knew that the other person was constantly moving house.
    Thank you, sound shift. :)
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Where are you currently residing?
    In the US, most adults understand this sentence. "Reside" is more formal than "live", so young school children may not know the word "reside" yet.

    It is a normal and common question, especially in writing. Forms often say "Current residence: " with a blank to fill in.

    This question means "what is your exact address, right now, today?" The answer includes country, state/province, town, street name, building number on street, and apartment number within the building.

    "Where are you from" means "where did you live, years ago, when you were a child". That is a totally different question.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    "Where are you from" means "where did you live, years ago, when you were a child". That is a totally different question.
    But not always. If you are in an obvious tourist situation, "Where are you from?" means "Where do you live?", i.e. "Where are you visiting from?"
     

    wolfbm1

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Thank you, dojibear and kentix.
    Where do you reside? That question sounds formal.
    Where do you live? That question is normally asked if we want to know one's place of residence.
    Where are you currently living? That question can be asked if the person is constantly moving house.
    Where are you from? The person we ask is a tourist or we want to know where they lived years ago.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    Where do you reside? That question sounds formal.
    Where do you live? That question is normally asked if we want to know one's place of residence.
    Where are you currently living? That question can be asked if the person is constantly moving house.
    Where are you from? The person we ask is a tourist or we want to know where they lived years ago.
    Yes, (1) with "reside" sounds very formal: the sort of question you'd find on an official form.

    Going right back to the OP's question I think it sounds a bizarre way for a teacher to ask a class of students on their first day of school where they live. :eek:
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Yes, (1) with "reside" sounds very formal: the sort of question you'd find on an official form.

    Going right back to the OP's question I think it sounds a bizarre way for a teacher to ask a class of students on their first day of school where they live. :eek:
    :thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:
    (If "reside" were a cognate of the Tagalog verb, I could see it, but I seriously doubt that's the case." :cool:
     
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