where he qualified himself to teach

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azz

Senior Member
armenian
He went to the University of Moscow, where he qualified himself to teach Physics.

Can't the above sentence have two different meanings:
a. He was qualified to teach Phyiscs, but we don't know where he was going to teach it... Maybe he was qualified to teach Physics at high schools.

b. He was qualified to teach Physics at that very University. He was going to teach it there.
 
  • Nunty

    Senior Member
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    Welcoming bare footed bear to the forums :), I'm afraid I disagree.

    The phrase "where he qualified himself to teach physics" (although we usually would omit the word "himself") means that he obtained his qualification to teach physics at the University of Moscow. We do not know the terms of the qualification (where he could teach physics) from the sentence.
     

    bare footed bear

    Member
    Chinese
    Welcoming bare footed bear to the forums :), I'm afraid I disagree.

    The phrase "where he qualified himself to teach physics" (although we usually would omit the word "himself") means that he obtained his qualification to teach physics at the University of Moscow. We do not know the terms of the qualification (where he could teach physics) from the sentence.
    Thank you for correcting me. You are absolutely right.
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I understand azz's sentence as Nunty did. I would add, though, that I have never before seen the verb qualify used reflexively. The verb qualify is normally used in one of these ways:
    1) transitively with an inanimate subject: My studies in Moscow qualified me to teach Physics.
    2) intransitively with a human subject: I qualified to teach Physics.
     
    Last edited:

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    I understand azz's sentence as Nunty did. I would add, though, that I have never before seen the verb qualify used reflexively. The verb qualify is normally used in one of these ways:
    1) transitively with an inanimate subject: My studies in Moscow qualified me to teach Physics.
    2) intransitively with a human subject: I qualified to teach Physics.
    Yes, indeed. "He qualified himself to teach physics" sounds like it's talking about something underhand - like he just printed out a certificate for himself and said "there I am now qualified to teach physics".
     
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