Where the cancer

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mimi2

Senior Member
vietnam vietnamese
Hi,
Please tell me if "when" is suitable to be placed here? Can it replace with another word such as "the place" or something else. Thanks.

"For cancer treatment, the diseased cells must be killed while their healthy neighbours are left unharmed. Where the cancer can be directly and accurately attacked, laser treatment does well."
 
  • Joelline

    Senior Member
    American English
    Hi Mimi,

    In this case, think of "where the cancer can be..." as a shortened form of something like "in those cases where the cancer can be ...." You might be able to substitute "when" in ordinary language, but it may be, in medical terminology, more correct to use "where" (i.e. where the cancer is located determines whether lasers can be used at all. Obviously a cancer "hidden" behind a vital organ is not as open to laser attack as one which is no direct contact with a vital organ.

    Hope this helps a bit,
    Joelline
     

    mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    Hi, Joelline.
    I'm very glad to meet you. Thanks for your help.
    Yes, "Where" is suitable here but What is irritating me is the grammar structure. Can you analyse "Where the cancer can be directly and accurately attacked,"?
    Is "where the cancer" subject of the verb "can be attacked"?
    Thanks.
     

    Joelline

    Senior Member
    American English
    Mimi,

    "Where" is the adverb; "cancer" is the subject of "can be directly and accurately attacked." It is similar to saying "wherever you go, I will follow you" In the first clause, Wherever is the adverb, you is the subject, go is the verb.

    I hope this helps,
    Joelline
     

    mjscott

    Senior Member
    American English
    Hi,
    Please tell me if "when" is suitable to be placed here? Can it replace with another word such as "the place" or something else. Thanks.

    "For cancer treatment, the diseased cells must be killed while their healthy neighbours are left unharmed. Where the cancer can be directly and accurately attacked, laser treatment does well."
    I disagree with the previous counsel. Again, as with another of your posts, where the cancer can be directly and accurately attacked is a phrase. The subject of the sentence is treatment. The verb is does....
    ....Where the cancer can be directly and accurately attacked doesn't look like a prepositional phrase, but, in fact, is is. It modifies the verb does.

    Hope this helps.
     

    mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    Thanks.
    According to your explanation, I will rewrite this sentence like this then tell me if I am right?
    "Laser treatment does well in the place where the cancer can be directly and accurately attacked."
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Where in this sentence is not related to the location that is being talked about. If you replaced "Where the" with "For those patients whose" you would get the meaning of the sentence, but you would have lost some of the clinical detachment of the original.

    "For cancer treatment, the diseased cells must be killed while their healthy neighbours are left unharmed. Where the For those patients whose cancer can be directly and accurately attacked, laser treatment does well."
     

    mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    Panj.
    This sentence is difficult for me to analyse. I have not solved it yet.
     

    moura

    Senior Member
    Portuguese Portugal
    Hi Mimi

    A change of the structure and also a change of "where" for "when" could help? Like this:


    "For cancer treatment, the diseased cells must be killed while their healthy neighbours are left unharmed. Laser treatment does well when the cancer can be directly and accurately attacked."
     

    Joelline

    Senior Member
    American English
    I disagree with the previous counsel. Again, as with another of your posts, where the cancer can be directly and accurately attacked is a phrase. The subject of the sentence is treatment. The verb is does....
    ....Where the cancer can be directly and accurately attacked doesn't look like a prepositional phrase, but, in fact, is is. It modifies the verb does.
    quote]

    I have to disagree with this analysis. First, "Where the cancer can be directly and accurately attacked" is a dependent adverbial clause. It is a clause because it contains both a subject (cancer) and a verb (can be . . . attacked). It cannot, therefore, be a phrase (which is always lacking either a subject or a verb or both). It is surely NOT a prepositional phrase (there is no preposition in this clause). Thus the entire sentence is made up of 2 clauses: a dependent clause, followed by an independent clause: "Where the cancer can be directly and accurately attacked, laser treatment does well."
     
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