where the river’s all rain and roses in a misty pinpoint darkness

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bacchebenevenies

Senior Member
Español (Argentina)
Hola de nuevo. En On the road:
We wheeled through the sultry old light of Algiers, back on the ferry, back toward the mud-splashed, crabbed old ships across the river, back on Canal, and out; on a two-lane highway to Baton Rouge in purple darkness; swung west there, crossed the Mississippi at a place called Port Allen. Port Allen - where the river’s all rain and roses in a misty pinpoint darkness and where we swung around a circular drive in yellow foglight and suddenly saw the great black body below a bridge and crossed eternity again.
Tengo dos dudas: lo de la lluvia y las rosas, y sobre todo lo de las rosas, ¿es más bien una metáfora o debo interpretarlo literalmente? Y luego, ¿cuál es el significado de "pinpoint" en esta cita?

Muchas gracias.
 
  • Sprachliebhaber

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I think this may be an instance where the sound or feeling of a word was more important to the author than its literal meaning. Literally, "pinpoint darkness" doesn't make sense. It seems to suggest that the darkness is so profound that it seems to close around them and form a tiny, isolating space.
     

    Raposu

    Senior Member
    English USA
    Pinpoint as a noun can refer to a tiny dot (punto o puntito). As an adjective it suggests precision (exacto o precisio).
     

    FromPA

    Senior Member
    USA English
    It just a bunch of words that are intended to sound eloquent but don't have any discernible meaning. Good luck translating that!

    My advise: ignore all the adjectives.
     
    Last edited:

    Raposu

    Senior Member
    English USA
    I have to disagree with you, FromPA. This passage does have meaning, but it lies below the surface of the words. Kerouac isn't literally describing what he sees, he's expressing the feelings that the exerience generates in his mind. Of course, as the Italians have expressed, "tradditore traduttore," but I think it is still possible to achieve a translation of sorts if we ignore the literal meaning of the words and focus on creating similiar feelings and emotions in Spanish. I'll leave such a translation to native speakers.
     

    FromPA

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I have to disagree with you, FromPA. This passage does have meaning, but it lies below the surface of the words. Kerouac isn't literally describing what he sees, he's expressing the feelings that the exerience generates in his mind. Of course, as the Italians have expressed, "tradditore traduttore," but I think it is still possible to achieve a translation of sorts if we ignore the literal meaning of the words and focus on creating similiar feelings and emotions in Spanish. I'll leave such a translation to native speakers.
    Well, we both agree that it's necessary to ignore the literal meaning of his words. Good luck to the translator.
     
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