Where there's muck there's money

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Thomas1

Senior Member
polszczyzna warszawska
<< Topic: Where there's muck there's money. >>

What does the above sentence/saying mean, please??
Is it American or British??

Thanks for help,
Thomas
 
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  • JLanguage

    Senior Member
    USA: American English, Learning Hebrew and Spanish
    Thomas1 said:
    What does the above sentence/saying mean, please??
    Is it American or British??

    Thanks for help,
    Thomas
    "Meaning:
    Where there are dirty jobs to be done there is money to be made.

    Origin:
    Originated in Yorkshire, England where brass is a slang term for money. Hardly used nowadays, although writers sometimes call on it when they want to establish a character as a blunt Yorkshireman."

    From The Phrase Finder, http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/408900.html.
     

    Tom Pen

    New Member
    english yorkshire
    Its still used in Yorkshire and is probably the origin of the supposed common saying "where there's Brass", which is not a common saying only by folk's pretending to be working class Yorkshire folk.

    The saying is a bit like a rhyme and sounds good, unlike the Brass version which is usually only used in such statements as "a bet that cost a bit a brass" (meaning the owners not short of a bob or two !) .

    With recycling being in fashion the muck saying is getting more popular.
     

    lamplighter

    New Member
    English - England
    My father used to say this all the time. It's something you pick up in the business world.

    It's meaning should be self evident. Where there is stuff people don't like ("muck"), there is opportunity ("brass" or money to be made). Recycling is a great example. But I've found the expression highly relevant in many contexts. It is not as an earlier poster suggested anything to do with the bourgeoisie pretending to be working class. But it was most certainly popular among business men from working class backgrounds (especially from up north - like my father). It's use still exists, <<...>>
     
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    Mahantongo

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    It's meaning should be self evident.
    Welcome to the forum, lamplighter.

    Note that its meaning is only self-evident if one associates the word "brass" with money. However, since that association is not natural either to most learners, or even to most native English speakers (who live in the US, where "brass" is not a term associated with money), then the meaning is not so self-evident.
     
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    Mahantongo

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    thank you for the welcome. absolutely. however the OP's original question uses "money" not "brass". :p
    The original question was posted ten years ago, in 2005. As there was little likelihood that the OP would come back after all this time to find an additional response, my response was intended to address your post made in the last few hours, and which specifically referred to "brass". That being said, the association of "muck" with "money" is also not self-evident.
     

    Tom Pen

    New Member
    english yorkshire
    The original question was posted ten years ago, in 2005. As there was little likelihood that the OP would come back after all this time to find an additional response, my response was intended to address your post made in the last few hours, and which specifically referred to "brass". That being said, the association of "muck" with "money" is also not self-evident.
    Hi folks ,
    I still keep hearing where there's muck there's brass on the BBC news in UK by presenters, also a bit by locals referring to a local rendering plant !
    A Shame we don't hear the money version much, <<...>> spread the word folks !
    Cheers
    Tom
     
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    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I have never heard "where there's muck there's money". It's always been "where there's muck there's brass". Post #3 is wrong in saying it is "Hardly used nowadays".

    <<...>>
     
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