"Where's the fire?"

Ume

Banned
Japanese
Hello.

"Where's the fire?"
Is this common?

A: Hurry up! We need to leave really soon!
B: Just calm down! Where's the fire?
 
  • Ume

    Banned
    Japanese
    Chaska Ñawi,
    Thanks for the response.

    "Where's the fire?" and "What's the rush?"
    I wonder if these two are heard in the UK as well.
     

    Sweet-Girl

    Member
    Arabic / Bahrain
    I think Where's the fire ? is not that common as it seems to be , or perhaps because I've never heard it before. As to "What's the rush" I think it is really common in Uk , USA , Canada and everywhere even in my country :D
     

    CAMullen

    Senior Member
    US, English
    I think although most AE speakers understand it, few actually use it. It's probably something fiction writers used to have policemen say to drivers they had stopped for speeding. At least I always picture a policeman with an open ticket pad when I hear the question.
     

    GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    CAMullen said:
    I think although most AE speakers understand it, few actually use it. It's probably something fiction writers used to have policemen say to drivers they had stopped for speeding. At least I always picture a policeman with an open ticket pad when I hear the question.
    Light another match for us Southern-folk. "Where's the fire," or more likely "Where's the fah-ur?" is still quite common.
     

    Ume

    Banned
    Japanese
    Thanks for the comments, everyone. They're all helpful.

    More and more people have been responding to my postings.
     

    Isotta

    Senior Member
    English, Hodgepodge
    I've never heard the expression in the parts of the American South I'm acquainted with. I've actually never heard anyone say that before.

    Personally I think it would come across as cheesy 1950's, like "shoot the grease."
     

    GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    I've not heard "shoot the Grease" either.

    Isotta is acquainted (I believe) with the eastern "South." My southern experience is definitely much further West - as in the prairie states. The Mother Road is "Route 66," where one can "get one's kicks."
     

    Isotta

    Senior Member
    English, Hodgepodge
    GenJen54 said:
    I've not heard "shoot the Grease" either.

    Isotta is acquainted (I believe) with the eastern "South." My southern experience is definitely much further West - as in the prairie states. The Mother Road is "Route 66," where one can "get one's kicks."
    Yes. Referring to the Southwest as the South always throws me off. In the Southeast, people tend to leave out Oklahoma, Arizona, Texas, etc., out of the "South," because of some cultural, linguistic and mostly historical differences. Which is not exactly considerate, much less accurate.

    "Shoot the grease" or "pass the butter" is not common; I've only met a few people who say it. It was offered for the purpose of illustration.
     

    cirrus

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Or the centre of bloody everything in my experience.

    Meanwhile - shoot the grease, pass the butter mean what exactly? Can anyone enlighten me?
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    cirrus said:
    Or the centre of bloody everything in my experience.

    Meanwhile - shoot the grease, pass the butter mean what exactly? Can anyone enlighten me?
    See separate threads where these were discussed.
    Shoot the grease = pass the butter = exactly what it says, I would like some butter but I can't reach it myself; would someone please pass it to me.
     
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