wherever my feet take me

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rusita preciosa

Modus forendi
Russian (Moscow)
Is there a saying in your language that mean "going/wandering without a plan or a specific destination"? In English it involves feet; in Russian - eyes.

English:
wherever my feet take me

Russian:
куда глаза глядят /kuda glaza gliadiat/ - wherever eyes look

How about your language?
 
  • Orlin

    Banned
    български
    Is there a saying in your language that mean "going/wandering without a plan or a specific destination"? In English it involves feet; in Russian - eyes.

    English:
    wherever my feet take me

    Russian:
    куда глаза глядят /kuda glaza gliadiat/ - wherever eyes look

    How about your language?
    Мы говорим почти как по-русски: където ми, ти... видят очите.
     

    jazyk

    Senior Member
    Brazílie, portugalština
    In Portuguese:
    aonde (os) meus pés me levarem - wherever my feet take me
    aonde me der na telha - lit.: wherever it gives me on the tile. I think the tile here refers to one's head, i.e. following one's own head, wherever one's fancy takes one.
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    I don't think we use the literal expression: 'waar mijn voeten mij ook brengen'. I'd say: 'waar mijn weg ook heen leidt' (wherever my way/path leads to). But I wonder whether it really means the same: it is like a spiritual answer, accepting whatever happens. Is it like that in your mind, M?

    In the more practical meaning I know of something funny in my dialect: 'op goed-valle-'t-uit'. literally: in the way of 'Good may it turn [lit. fall] out'... Something like 'op goed geluk (af)': towards good luck, or maybe more precise aiming/ hoping for good luck.
     
    Last edited:
    I don't think we use the literal expression: 'waar mijn voeten mij ook brengen'. I'd say: 'waar mijn weg ook heen leidt' (wherever my way/path leads to). But I wonder whether it really means the same: it is like a spiritual answer, accepting whatever happens. Is it like that in your mind, M?

    In the more practical meaning I know of something funny in my dialect: 'op goed-valle-'t-uit'. literally: in the way of 'Good may it turn [lit. fall] out'... Something like 'op goed geluk (af)': towards good luck, or maybe more precise aiming/ hoping for good luck.
    That reminds me, we say almost the same, «όπου με/μας πάει ο δρόμος μου/μας»
    (o'pu me [1st p sing]/mas [1st p pl] 'pai o 'ðromos mu [1st p sing]/mas [1st p pl]) lit. "wherever my/our path take me/us". An expression which - I agree - declares some sort of fatalism.
    A slightly different expression is «γιά όσο βαστάνε τα πόδια μου/μας» (ja 'oso vas'tane ta 'poðja mu [1st p sing]/mas [1st p pl]) lit. "for as long as my/our feet stand up to" (which manifests strength, faith in our abilities); e.g. "Aren't you tired of trying to get this job?"
    "No, I'll keep trying for as long as my feet stand up to"
     
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