whether <acknowledged> or not

  • boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    I would say 'acknowledged' is the adjectival use of the past participle 'acknowledged' in a non-finite phrase embedded in a sentence to modify one of its elements (the subject 'a deed'). There is an implied verb 'to be' that has been left out - whether it is acknowledged or not.
     

    ytyyutianyun

    Member
    chinese
    I would say 'acknowledged' is the adjectival use of the past participle 'acknowledged' in a non-finite phrase embedded in a sentence to modify one of its elements (the subject 'a deed'). There is an implied verb 'to be' that has been left out - whether it is acknowledged or not.
    Thanks, your answer is very clearly. I know it.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    From the WR dictionary: to acknowledge is "to recognize or admit the existence, truth, or reality of".

    If the deed was legally executed, it's valid even if someone refuses to admit it.
     

    ytyyutianyun

    Member
    chinese
    From the WR dictionary: to acknowledge is "to recognize or admit the existence, truth, or reality of".

    If the deed was legally executed, it's valid even if someone refuses to admit it.
    So I can also say "whether admit or not", right?
     
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