whether or not these underlying investments distribute will impact

alili81

Senior Member
French (France)
Hello !

This is part of a text I'm translating (about investment funds tax law in Belgium). I'm puzzled by the end of this sentence (blue): does it sound correct to native speakers? If it does, what does it mean?
I sense there's a spelling mistake or a missing word here, but I don't have a clue what it is.
Thanks in advance for any help!


The tax analysis in the hands of the Belgian investor will depend on whether or not the fund distributes income, the type of underlying investment and whether or not these underlying investments distribute will impact.
 
  • Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    Makes no sense to me, unless "will impact" [object: noun] can be distributed [verb] by investments [subject]. But what is "will impact" (the impact that a will has?) and can it be distributed? Doesn't sound likely to me. The first clause also seems shaky: how can a tax analysis depend on anything, if it is already in the hands of an investor? If it is in someone's hands it is complete, and therefore cannot depend on anything any more.
     

    Joelline

    Senior Member
    American English
    Hi,

    I can answer your first question (does it sound correct to native speakers?): No, it certainly does not.

    I don't know much about investments, but the first problem is the shift from "investment" to "investments"; the second is the verb "distribute" instead of the noun "distributions"; the third problem is that the verb "impact" has no object.

    The following sentence makes sense grammatically, but I can't guarantee it is what the original writer wanted to say: whether or not the underlying investment distributions will have an impact on...... (or will impact).... [and we still don't know what the impact will be on!].
     

    JeffJo

    Senior Member
    USA
    USA, English
    'The tax analysis, in the hands of the Belgian investor, will depend on

    (1.) whether or not the fund distributes income,
    (2.) the type of underlying investment, and
    (3.) whether or not these underlying investments distribute will impact.'

    It doesn't make sense. It looks like a poor English translation of something else to begin with. Was it originally a Belgian document, that you're translating to French from an English translation? Or anything like that? Something has been lost, or garbled. It's Babelfishy.

    In (3.) the phrase should probably be "the underlying investment." Or, change (2.) to plural: investments.

    Maybe?? - "these underlying investments distribute will impact" = the underlying investments will distribute the tax impact. Maybe!
     

    alili81

    Senior Member
    French (France)
    Thanks for taking the time to read my weird sentence (at least we all agree it's not correct English!). The text is part of a series of 10 about the tax position of investors in various European country, so I don't think it was originally written in French then translated into English - however, the overall style is often awkward, therefore I doubt the person who wrote it was a native speaker...
    My guess is: "whether or not these underlying investments (will) impact the distribution // the distributed income", as this sounds logical from a "tax law point of view". I'll base my translation on that, but I guess I'll have to add a footnote to point out the incoherent sentence structure...
    Thanks to all of you anyway and have a nice evening (or whatever part of the day is left in your part of the world).
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Assuming that will in will impact has nothing to do with probate, then, taking an analogy with tax laws elsewhere: The tax obligations of a Belgian investor will depend on whether or not the fund distributes income, the type of underlying investment, and to whom the income is distributed. Now you have something which makes sense; whether it means what the original meant is anyone's guess.

    The original looks very much like one of those automatic translations, except they are usually a bit easier to follow.
     
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