whether sex, substance, symbol, or relational addiction

Virginia1993

Senior Member
Persian
Hi there,

What does Sex/substance/symbol refer to in the following text?

Count on the fact that whatever we deny within, we will compulsively seek in the outer instead. When we have not valued Eros as the search for greater knowledge of self and world, then we
are far more likely to become enslaved to our projects and projections—whether sex, substance, symbol, or relational addiction—for nothing holds greater power over us than our
unconsciousness, which perforce makes decisions on our behalf throughout the conduct of daily life.

What matters most, Hollis

Thank you in advance.
 
  • cidertree

    Senior Member
    Béarla na hÉireann (Hiberno-English)
    The three words are part of a list of categories, which includes relational addition (whatever that is).
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Hollis seems to be referring to becoming addicted to sex or drugs (substance). I am not sure what symbol refers to. Perhaps it refers to material symbols of power or success.
     

    Virginia1993

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Perhaps 'symbol' refers to titles people aspire to, such as "lord", or to notable addresses, for example Park Avenue in New York. Also, perhaps the superyachts of the new billionaires that have been in the news.
    Perhaps 'symbol' refers to titles people aspire to, such as "lord", or to notable addresses, for example Park Avenue in New York. Also, perhaps the superyachts of the new billionaires that have been in the news.
    Nice👍👍
     

    stream21

    Senior Member
    Russian
    In older English, “substance” can mean “wealth”.

    As for symbol, I don't know what exactly the author could mean, but in a very general sense the problem is as follows:
    Symbol has no value on its own; its value entirely depends on to what extent it connects us, so to speak, to the thing it symbolizes.
    A symbol in our life can come to the forefront and the thing it symbolizes takes the back seat. The only example that comes to the mind is from the religious sphere: The church is a symbol of God.

    I think this explanation makes some sense in the context of the first sentence: ... whatever we deny within, we will compulsively seek in the outer instead. In other words, we try to replace the true thing within with its outer symbol. Although the author may mean by symbol something else
     
    Last edited:

    lentulax

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I suspect more context is needed. Given that that the three words in bold define the projections to which we are far more likely to be enslaved 'When we have not valued Eros as the search for greater knowledge of self and world', it's difficult to see how they could carry some of the meanings suggested above. Perforce, as Mr Hollis might say, must one read the whole book, but I'm not Jung enough for that.
     

    Virginia1993

    Senior Member
    Persian
    In older English, “substance” can mean “wealth”.

    As for symbol, I don't know what exactly the author could mean, but in a very general sense the problem is as follows:
    Symbol has no value on its own; its value entirely depends on to what extent it connects us, so to speak, to the thing it symbolizes.
    A symbol in our life can come to the forefront and the thing it symbolizes takes the back seat. The only example that comes to the mind is from the religious sphere: The church is a symbol of God.

    I think this explanation makes some sense in the context of the first sentence: ... whatever we deny within, we will compulsively seek in the outer instead. In other words, we try to replace the true thing within with its outer symbol. Although the author may mean by symbol something else
    T
    In older English, “substance” can mean “wealth”.

    As for symbol, I don't know what exactly the author could mean, but in a very general sense the problem is as follows:
    Symbol has no value on its own; its value entirely depends on to what extent it connects us, so to speak, to the thing it symbolizes.
    A symbol in our life can come to the forefront and the thing it symbolizes takes the back seat. The only example that comes to the mind is from the religious sphere: The church is a symbol of God.

    I think this explanation makes some sense in the context of the first sentence: ... whatever we deny within, we will compulsively seek in the outer instead. In other words, we try to replace the true thing within with its outer symbol. Although the author may mean by symbol something else
    Thanks for explaining.
     

    Virginia1993

    Senior Member
    Persian
    I suspect more context is needed. Given that that the three words in bold define the projections to which we are far more likely to be enslaved 'When we have not valued Eros as the search for greater knowledge of self and world', it's difficult to see how they could carry some of the meanings suggested above. Perforce, as Mr Hollis might say, must one read the whole book, but I'm not Jung enough for that.
    Thank you.
    I think it refers to Jung's distinguish between "sign" and "symbol".
     
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