which I have never done

azz

Senior Member
armenian
a. They crossed the border illegally, which I have never done.

Is the above sentence grammatically correct?

The sentence is mine.

The meaning of the last part is that "I have never crossed the border illegally". I think the sentence is fine.

Many thanks.
 
  • azz

    Senior Member
    armenian
    Thank you Grassy,

    No, I don't have a context. But the idea is really simple.

    They did X, which I have never done.

    Either the grammatical structure works or doesn't.

    Many thanks.
     

    grassy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Okay, but why would you mention you've never done that? Do you consider crossing the border illegally to be a bad thing or an achievement?
     

    azz

    Senior Member
    armenian
    I don't really think that matters. It could be either. It is also possible that there is no value judgement involved and a bare fact is stated as a fact. The question is whether the 'which' clause works here or not.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I've often seen this kind of construction, so it is in use.

    I don't know whether it's grammatically correct but I suspect not, because "which" cannot properly refer to a conjugated verb, i.e. I can't see it here as a being a "sentential which". It can refer back to a gerund phrase:

    They were in the habit of crossing the border illegally, which I have never done. :tick:

    They crossed the border illegally, (which is) something I've never done.:tick:
    They crossed the border illegally, a thing I have never done.:tick:
     
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