which lists they shall sign and certify

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NewAmerica

Banned
Mandarin
The use of "which" sounds very old-fashioned to me.

Does it mean "they shall sign and certify such lists..."?

Thanks in advance
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Twelfth Amendment to the United States Constitution
The Electors shall meet in their respective states
, and vote by ballot for President and Vice-President, one of whom, at least, shall not be an inhabitant of the same state with themselves; they shall name in their ballots the person voted for as President, and in distinct ballots the person voted for as Vice-President, and they shall make distinct lists of all persons voted for as President, and all persons voted for as Vice-President and of the number of votes for each, which lists they shall sign and certify, and transmit sealed to the seat of the government of the United States, directed to the President of the Senate.

Source
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Yes, it means that, 'but 'they shall sign . . .' is an independent clause, while the original uses a relative clause attached to the word 'lists' about 23 words before that. It repeats the word as part of the relative marker 'which lists'. This is hardly ever done today, but is still possible in formal writing.
     

    Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    It repeats the word as part of the relative marker 'which lists'. This is hardly ever done today, but is still possible in formal writing.
    Yes; the repetition of "lists" allows the structure of the sentence to be kept simple while clarifying what the antecedent of "which" is. Without it, you would have to break up the sentence or employ some longer locutution locution, or else the "which" would seem like it referred to "votes."
     
    Last edited:

    NewAmerica

    Banned
    Mandarin
    Yes; the repetition of "lists" allows the structure of the sentence to be kept simple while clarifying what the antecedent of "which" is. Without it, you would have to break up the sentence or employ some longer locutution, or else the "which" would seem like it referred to "votes."
    Good point. Locution?
     
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