Which noun comes after the preposition "in": tension, or tensity?

  • *Cowgirl*

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Welcome to the forums!

    I don't think that I understand what you are asking....Maybe some context will help...
     

    Kelly B

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I can't imagine ever using the word "tensity" so I vote for "tension" in the absence of context.

    I wonder if it is necessary to add that "intensity" is a perfectly good, but different, word.
     

    James Stephens

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    You may be looking for the adjective: The muscles of his face grew tense when he was accused of lying. Those were tense moments for the hostages.

    Past tense of the verb: He tensed his muscles and prepared for the fight. He tensed and relaxed the muscles of his shoulders as a relaxation technique.

    As a noun: The tension in the room unbearable.

    I can't think of a time when "in tension" would be good useage.
     

    Kelly B

    Senior Member
    USA English
    An increase in tension may cause the bolted joint to fail.
    It might be the downfall of a business negotiation, too, I suppose. (Added to prove I'm not just a camhead)
     

    nycphotography

    Senior Member
    American English
    Kelly B said:
    An increase in tension may cause the bolted joint to fail.
    It might be the downfall of a business negotiation, too, I suppose. (Added to prove I'm not just a camhead)
    And also to a relationship or to a psyche.

    An increase in tension may cause the stressed nut to crack (at which point he may go postal).
     
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