which option is the best one?

  • emma42

    Senior Member
    British English
    They mean the same thing, of course, but I just think aloud is a bit more formal/literary. Certainly in England, one would usually say "I'm just thinking out loud" instead of "I'm just thinking aloud". Oh, I'm not sure now, thinking about it a bit more (but not out loud!)
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    emma42 said:
    Oh, I'm not sure now, thinking about it a bit more (but not out loud!)
    If you were to think out loud Emma, it might become more clear! :D

    I prefer to think out loud if I were saying it, because aloud sounds like allowed. It wouldn't matter if I were to write it.
     

    emma42

    Senior Member
    British English
    Oh Charles, I don't think anyone would mistake aloud for allowed in the context of think out loud, but then I've never been to Australia!
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    emma42 said:
    Oh Charles, I don't think anyone would mistake aloud for allowed in the context of think out loud, but then I've never been to Australia!
    I just edited my post to make it more clear. If it were written then it would be obvious. If you were to say it, they would sound exactly the same. I know that the context would indicate what you were talking about, but it just sounds better to me.
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    emma42 said:
    Oh, right, I think I understand now. You would not want to use aloud because it might confuse non native speakers?
    You didn't have your tongue in your cheek when you were writing this, did you Emma? :D
    Actually, I hadn't thought about that, but it could be a bit confusing to a non native speaker.
     

    emma42

    Senior Member
    British English
    Seriously, no, Charles! I honestly could not work out how you could think that anyone hearing you say "I am thinking aloud" could mistake it for "I am thinking allowed", simply because the latter does not make any sense!
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    emma42 said:
    Seriously, no, Charles! I honestly could not work out how you could think that anyone hearing you say "I am thinking aloud" could mistake it for "I am thinking allowed", simply because the latter does not make any sense!
    Or "I am thin!" King Al 'owled:D
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    Thinking Aloud was the title of a weekly religious column in one of the Irish newspapers for many years. It was obviously intended as a pun. (Of course depending on which flavour religion you prefer, real indpendent thinking is often discouraged!)
     
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