Which phrases does 'with' govern?

bluehorse

New Member
Chinese-Chinese
By 2012 the Army was organized into three corps with seven armored divisions, three mechanized divisions, a special forces division, and one Republican Guard division. Among the sentence, "seven armored divisions, three mechanized divisions, a special forces division, and one Republican Guard division" behind "with" all belong the "three corps" ? or only "seven armored divisions" belong? or "seven armored divisions, three mechanized divisions, a special forces division" belong? What the determining basis is?
Thanks!
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Well, a list has to have 'and' before the last item. So we can't read it as this:

    :cross:seven armored divisions, three mechanized divisions, a special forces division

    because it should be this if just these three belonged to the three corps:

    seven armored divisions, three mechanized divisions, and a special forces division

    Now if a corps contains divisions, it is unlikely that there would be some divisions in a corps and other divisions not in a corps. That is, this is very unlikely:

    :thumbsdown: three corps (with seven armored divisions), three mechanized divisions, a special forces division, and one Republican Guard division

    It is much more likely that the three divisions and the other divisions are in the same place as the seven divisions, thus:

    three corps (with seven armored divisions, three mechanized divisions, a special forces division, and one Republican Guard division)
     
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