which the main route from the south was carried across the mouths of the Rhine

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serhatuygur

Senior Member
Turkish
Hello, I'm trying to comprehend the exact meaning of the sentence below and I need to clarify two things: Are the bridges at Rotterdam, Dordrecht and Moerdijk are on the mouth of Rhine in Holland and is the main route from south runs along the river? Thank you very much for your help.

"The main effort, under my own control, was directed against the bridges at Rotterdam, Dordrecht, and Moerdijk by which the main route from the south was carried across the mouths of the Rhine."

Source: The Other Side of the Hill by Liddell Hart.
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    The Rhine in Holland splits into several branches, flowing more or less from east to west. The main route is from south to north, and the quote refers to it crossing three of these branches on bridges.
     

    serhatuygur

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    The Rhine in Holland splits into several branches, flowing more or less from east to west. The main route is from south to north, and the quote refers to it crossing three of these branches on bridges.
    Thank you very much Jack, so "mouths" here is synonymous with "branches", am I correct?
     

    Hans in Texas

    Senior Member
    US English
    Serhatuygur, “mouth” means the location where the river flows into the sea, so it seems a bit strange that your author writes about bridges at the 3 mouths of the Rhine. I wouldn’t expect to see a bridge just a few(hundred) meters from the ocean; “branch” would be more accurate, I would say.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Serhatuygur, “mouth” means the location where the river flows into the sea, so it seems a bit strange that your author writes about bridges at the 3 mouths of the Rhine. I wouldn’t expect to see a bridge just a few(hundred) meters from the ocean; “branch” would be more accurate, I would say.
    The Rhine begins to split up into separate channels about 70 km from the sea, and the bridges being discussed are about 40 km from the sea (and it is a sea, not an ocean, off the coast of Holland).

    I see no problem describing this whole area as "the mouth of the Rhine", but I don't know the correct term for the individual waterways. "Mouths" does not sound too unreasonable to me.
     

    Hans in Texas

    Senior Member
    US English
    I remember the rocky Oregon coast from my UO days, sdgraham. In TX we think about low-elevation mud coasts with no available bedrock for bridge support. The Mississippi delta goes on for miles and miles below the last bridge, as I suppose the Rhine does, according to Uncle Jack’s description.
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    Yes. I suppose it is a delta.
    Per Wiki:
    The Rhine–Meuse–Scheldt delta or Helinium is a river delta in the Netherlands formed by the confluence of the Rhine, the Meuse and the Scheldt rivers. The result is a multitude of islands, branches and branch names that may at first sight look bewildering, especially as a waterway that appears to be one continuous stream may change names as many as seven times, e.g. Rhine → Bijlands Kanaal → Pannerdens Kanaal → Nederrijn → Lek → Nieuwe Maas → Het Scheur → Nieuwe Waterweg (→ North Sea). Since the Rhine contributes most of the water, the shorter term Rhine Delta is commonly used. However, this name is also used for the river delta where the Rhine flows into Lake Constance, so it is clearer to call the larger one Rhine–Meuse delta, or even Rhine–Meuse–Scheldt delta, as the Scheldt ends in the same delta. By some calculations, the delta covers 25,347 km2 (9,787 sq mi), making it the largest in Europe.
     
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